Advisory Council

Advisory Council

John Butkus

John teaches partner dancing with a focus on the connection and the physical conversation that takes place between two people gliding across the floor as one. John enjoys many types of dance and has a passion for West Coast Swing and Argentine Tango.

A photographer for most of his life, John creates magic from the mundane by capturing the light that bounces off of ordinary objects.

When John’s not dancing, teaching or behind the camera, he runs a software company that specializes in Energy Management, Building Automation Controls and HVAC systems. His expertise is writing code as an art to save energy, one BTU at a time.

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Advisory Council

Ira Baumgarten

Ira Baumgarten is a Senior Consultant for the National Coalition Building Institute (NCBI). He coordinates NCBI’s school based diversity and leadership programs. Ira is a trained mediator and also provides consulting services to resolve workplace conflicts. He has developed and instituted successful organizational intervention models. 

He recently worked with Kinuso School District in Alberta Canada, a mixed community of First Nation and Non-First Nation families. The project goal was to build strong inter-group relations resulting in a more caring school environment for all children and their families. 

Prior to becoming a consultant, Ira worked for over twenty years administering education and training programs for the Civil Service Employee Association (CSEA) and the United Auto Workers and Ford Motor Company.  At CSEA he was responsible for the negotiation and administration of the educational benefits for the CSEA-State represented workforce. In that capacity he assisted in the development of the New York State – CSEA Partnership for Education and Training and served as its labor Co-director for six years.  In that capacity he instituted many educational opportunities including creative writing and photography classes for workers entitled Unseenameria – Pictures and Words of Working Lives. 

His interests include training for sprint-triathlons, traveling and camping with his wife, Nadine, being a new Grandfather, and writing. He currently is engaged in self-publishing an end-of-life story and audio book for adults. 

Ira has a BA degree from State University of New York at Oneonta and a Masters Degree in Adult Education from Syracuse University.

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Advisory Council

Russell Bennett

Russell Bennett is a recently retired attorney who has lived in Averill Park on the shores of Burden Lake for the last 33 years, a short distance from the Mill.  A graduate of Middlebury College and Albany Law School, he worked for the New York State Court of Appeals and the New York State Department of Social Services (now Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance) in a variety of legislative, house counsel and litigation roles. He has also served numerous terms as Town Attorney for the Town of Sand Lake. Along with wife, DeDe, he is an enthusiastic lover of the arts.

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Visiting Artist, Advisory Council

John Conaty

 

John Conaty is currently the sole proprietor of J. Conaty Architects and was the Owner’s Representative on site for the construction, opening and Park Manager for Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park on Roosevelt Island in New York City. He was previously a partner in the Firm Standard Architects in Brooklyn, NY for 14 years. As a partner at Standard Architects, John converted several manufacturing Buildings to residential condo properties, and constructed new buildings throughout Greenpoint and Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Prior to establishing Standard Architects, John work for the firm of Smith Miller and Hawkinson Architects in Manhattan. While at the firm, he was the project architect on The North Carolina Museum of Art Outdoor Amphitheater and the Corning Glass Museum.

John received a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Environmental Design from Parsons School of Design in 1986 and Bachelor of Architecture from The Cooper Union in 1990. John Conaty has been a registered Architect in the State of New York since 1994. 

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Advisory Council, Visiting Artist

Robert Dalton Harris

 

“I live in the Garden of Eden, and there is a lot of good work to do.” The structures built (spiral staircase, shack-in-the-back, skywalk, tree house, temple-to-available-materials) reflect Rob’s imaginative blending of taxonomy and deep thinking – as do his extensive historical collections.

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Advisory Council, Visiting Artist

Remo Guidieri

Studied with Claude Levi-Strass and did field-works in: South-east Melanesia, Central Polynesia. Has been Professor in anthropology and aesthetics, Paris since 1972; Visiting Professor, Irwin Chanin School of Architecture, Cooper Union, New York, since 1989; co-founder (1981) of Res, Journal of Anthropology and Aesthetics, Harvard, Mass. Author of countless essays and books, published in France, Italy, Spain, Mexico, Rumania, Germany, and USA. Recent titles include: Argonautics, Pièges & Outils (Traps & Tools), 2007; Miroir du vestibule (Mirror of the vestibule) 2009; Géométrie sauvage (Savage Geometry) 2010. On Loan and Sacrifice, Too Late, Too Early.

 

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Advisory Council, Visiting Artist

Michael Harrison

“Michael Harrison's Revelation: Music in Pure Intonation is probably the most brilliant and original extended composition for solo piano since the early works of Frederic Rzewski three decades ago (and no, I’m not forgetting Elliott Carter).” Pulitzer Prize-winning music critic, Tim Page

 

Composer/pianist Michael Harrison occupies a unique place in the world of music. His works are a blend of European musical traditions and those of North Indian classical music, forging an entirely new approach to composition through tunings and methodologies that employ and extend the ancient concept of “just intonation.” The quality of his work and personal vision has earned him the label of, in the words of composer Philip Glass, an "American maverick.” 

As a recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship (2018), Harrison will be creating a new work for Alarm Will Sound. He is currently working on a commission for Del Sol Quartet, based in San Francisco.

Time Loops, his album with cellist Maya Beiser, on Bang on a Can’s Cantaloupe Music label, was selected in NPR’s Top 10 Classical Albums of 2012. His 72-minute work for just intonation piano, Revelation: Music in Pure Intonation (Cantaloupe), was chosen by The New York Times, The Boston Globe and TimeOut New York as one of the Best Classical Recordings of 2007. 

Just Constellations, commissioned by Grammy-winning vocal octet, Roomful of Teeth, was premiered at MASS MoCA and the Park Avenue Armory, and recorded in The TANK, a 65’ water tank in rural Colorado with a 40-second reverb. The group’s performance was in the New Yorker’s “Ten Notable Performances of 2017,” and the subject of a feature article in which Alex Ross wrote, “Harrison’s glacially beautiful 2015 piece ‘Just Constellations’ made the deepest connection to the place: as luminous chords accumulated, it was difficult to tell which pitches were coming from live singers and which were coming out of the walls.” The New York Times wrote, “… particularly arresting, a celestial soundscape of gorgeous harmonies… the notes rang out like a jubilantly microtonal choir of bells.”

Just Ancient Loops, Harrison’s collaboration with filmmaker Bill Morrison and cellist Maya Beiser, has received over 40 performances, including a 4-month looping-program at the Museum of Modern Art, the Next Wave Festival at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, the Louvre, Bang on a Can marathon, Ojai Music Festival, Big Ears Festival, M.I.T., Strings of Autumn in Prague, at Sundance and other film festivals throughout the world. Nautilus wrote, “If there really is a music of the spheres, the sound of a fundamental harmony in the universe, it has to be Just Ancient Loops… Played on the cello, and complemented by a film created from archival clips and a recreation of Jupiter’s moons in orbit, Just Ancient Loops… propels viewers through time and space, landing them in the present, elated.”

Harrison’s professional engagements have included numerous international performances, including next season at Muziekgebouw, plus Just Ancient Loops in a new version written for the Amsterdam Cello Octet to be played in the Netherlands. Associations include Bang on a Can, Kronos Quartet, JACK Quartet, Contemporaneous, Young People’s Chorus of NYC, Stuttgart Ballet, media artist Loris Greaud (Centre Pompidou), architect David Gersten (RISD Museum), as well as his mentors, composers La Monte Young and Terry Riley.

Harrison’s works have also been performed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the United Nations, Carnegie’s Zankel Hall, Spoleto Festival USA, WNYC New Sounds Live at Merkin Concert Hall, National Sawdust, Monday Morning Concerts in Vancouver, The Newman Center for the Performing Arts, The Kitchen, Other Minds Festival, Klavier Festival Ruhr, Quattro Pianoforti in Rome, American Academy in Rome, and the Havana Contemporary Music Festival.

 

“A pulsating, shimmering wall of sound in which all kinds of ghost-like sound effects and structures appear.  A formidable pianist, Harrison… has a fascination with reconciling form and improvisation through raga-like structures, which beckon towards an unexplored universe of sound relationships.” 

– Marcus Boon, The Wire

 

As La Monte Young’s protégé, Harrison executed the specialized tunings and scores for Young's 6½-hour work, The Well-Tuned Piano, eventually becoming the only other person to perform this work. This led him to create the Harmonic Piano, an extensively modified grand piano capable of playing 24 notes per octave. Along with Young and Terry Riley, Harrison was a disciple of Indian vocalist Pandit Pran Nath, starting in 1979, and since 1999, he has continued studying and performing Indian classical music as a disciple of Ustad Mashkoor Ali Khan. He is co-founder and president of the American Academy of Indian Classical Music.

Harrison has been on the faculty at Manhattan School of Music, Rhode Island School of Design, Arts Letters & Numbers, and Bang on a Can Summer Institute. Recent awards include New Music USA, American Composers Forum Competition and Residency in Cuba, Aaron Copland Recording Grant, Classical Recording Foundation Award, University of Oregon Distinguished Alumnus Award, and the IBLA Fdn. Grand Prize. He has received fellowships and residencies from the American Academy in Rome, Dia Art Fdn., Yaddo, Ucross Fdn., Djerassi, Millay Colony, Bogliasco Fdn., La Napoule Art Fdn., Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, Marble House Project, I-Park Fdn., MELA Fdn., and the MacDowell Colony, where he has served on the Fellows Executive Committee since 2013. His works have been recorded on New World Records, New Albion Records, Innova Recordings, Important Records, Miasmah Recordings, Fortuna Records, Windham Hill Records, and Cantaloupe Music.

“The intelligent discrimination with which he approaches his work is something that I have heard only in a tiny handful of classical recordings starting with Glenn Gould.” – Stephen Hill, National Public Radio

 

© 2018 Michael Harrison Music                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              

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Advisory Council, Visiting Artist

Ed Keller

Director of the Center for Transformative Media at The New School, and Associate Professor at Parsons School of Design.  Designer, professor, writer, musician and multimedia artist.  Prior to joining Parsons, he taught at Columbia Univ. GSAPP [1998-2010] and SCIArc [2004-09].   With Carla Leitao he co-founded AUM Studio, an architecture and new media firm that has produced residential projects, competitions, and new media installations in Europe and the US.   His work and writing has appeared widely, in venues including Punctum, Praxis, ANY,  AD,  Arquine,  Leonardo Electronic Almanac,  Architecture,  Precis,  Wired,  Metropolis,  Assemblage, Ottagono, and Progressive Architecture.  He has spoken on architecturefilmtechnology and ecology internationally.  Ongoing courses at Parsons include Design for this Century,  Post-Planetary Design  and The Radical Future of Guitar.  Ed has been an avid rockclimber for over 35 years.

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Advisory Council, Visiting Artist

Alberto Pérez-Gómez

Alberto Pérez-Gómez was born in Mexico City in 1949 and became a Canadian Citizen and a Quebec resident in 1987. He obtained his undergraduate degree in architecture and engineering in Mexico City, did postgraduate work at Cornell University, and was awarded a Master of Arts and a Ph.D. by the University of Essex in England. He has taught at universities in Mexico City, Houston, Syracuse, and Toronto, at the Architectural Association in London, and was Director of the Carleton University School of Architecture from 1983 to 1986. He has lectured extensively worldwide.

His numerous articles have been published in the Journal of Architectural Education, AA Files, Arquitecturas Bis, Section A, VIA, Architectural Design,ARQ, SKALA, A+U, Perspecta, and many other periodicals. His first book in English, Architecture and the Crisis of Modern Science (MIT Press, 1983) won the Alice Davis Hitchcock Award in 1984, a prize awarded every two years for the most significant work of scholarship in the field.

In January 1987 Pérez-Gómez was appointed Saidye Rosner Bronfman Professor of the History of Architecture at McGill University, where he directs the History and Theory option. From March 1990 to June 1993, he was also the Founding Director of the Institut de recherche en histoire de l'architecture, a research institute which he instigated, co-sponsored by the Canadian Centre for Architecture, the Université de Montréal and McGill University. Students of Dr. Pérez-Gómez now teach most Canadian architecture programs, and in many North American and European Universities.

Dr. Pérez-Gómez is the author of Polyphilo or The Dark Forest Revisited (MIT Press, 1992), an erotic narrative/theory of architecture that retells the love story of the famous fifteenth century novel/treatise Hypnerotomachia Poliphiliin late twentieth-century terms, a text that has become the source of numerous projects and exhibitions. He is also co-editor of a now well-established series of books entitled CHORA: Intervals in the Philosophy of Architecture (McGill-Queen’s University Press), which collects essays exploring fundamental questions concerning the practice of architecture through its history and theories. A recent major book co-authored with Louise Pelletier, Architectural Representation and the Perspective Hinge (MIT Press, 1997), traces the history and theory of modern European architectural representation, with special reference to the role of projection in architectural design. In his most recent book, Built Upon Love: Architectural Longing after Ethics and Aesthetics(MIT Press, 2006), Pérez-Gómez examines points of convergence between ethics and poetics in architectural history and philosophy, and draws important conclusions for contemporary practice.

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Fellow, Advisory Council

Chris Rose

We know as much as our means of expression, engagement, our ‘art’ allows us to know, since we can know only what we have attempted to share, explain, present or negotiate. (From ‘Five Essays on Design’, 2006).

Chris Rose is a designer, author, academic and all-round visionary. He is known both for his work in arts-science-design collaborations and for his leadership of one of the UK’s best known multidisciplinary design programs, Three-Dimensional Design and Materials Practice, at the University of Brighton, England from 1993–2009. He brings his vision for 'seeing' things in different ways into many disciplines and for many purposes, all related to developing how we live and work for the better of all. Formerly a furniture and interior designer Chris was a member of the UK Crafts Council Index of Selected Makers and a recipient of the Worshipful Company of Furniture Makers Guild award. He and UK furniture artist Fred Baier shared studio design consultancy Baier-Rose Design, and Rose subsequently worked with Pearl Dot Furniture in London. He was invited to manage part of the independent Parnham Studio Furniture program established by John Makepeace, and later the multidisciplinary arts and design program at the University of Brighton, where he continued to broaden the connections and working links with materials science, art-science collaboration and European cross-border projects. Chris saw links between engineering and art+design practices long before it become fashionable. His work with collaborator Caroline Baillie on programs of 'Travelling Facts' and knowledge development through the Institute of Advanced studies in Berlin, first connected  ideas on interdisciplinary design to the complexities of social justice and ethics. His work on 'Composites on Tour' for the European Society for Composite Materials supported the development of design thinking of many engineering students throughout Europe.  In 2012 Chris consulted at Aalto University Helsinki with architect collaborator Saija Hollmen on proposals for new joint masters programs for engineering and architecture, applying concepts from the cognitive sciences for visual thinkers and designers. Currently Chris shares his time between three countries: Australia, the UK and the US where he works at Rhode Island School of Design as researcher, teacher, advisor and formerly as Dean of Graduate studies. His work in Australia frames the connections between sustainable design, Aboriginal ways of knowing and biomimimetics - learning from nature. 

Chris is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, London.


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Advisory Council, Visiting Artist

Wes Rozen

Westley Rozen grew up in five of the United States before settling in New York to attend Cooper Union in 1999, where he received a Benjamin Menschel Fellowship. In 2006, he pursued research in Copenhagen under a grant from the Danish Arts Council. His interests in film, mechanics, and animation have informed components of projects at Situ Studio and teaching positions at the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation at Columbia University, the Aarhus Architecture School, Denmark and the Royal Academy School of Architecture, Denmark.

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Advisory Council, Visiting Artist

Jessie Shefrin

As an artist/educator and leadership coach, Jessie Shefrin's work has been predicated on a deep and ongoing interest in investigating interdependent, integrative and interactive relational systems as experienced through the lens of art, design and business and their intrinsic connection to contemporary culture.

In the late 1980’s, her work focused on integrating electronic tools and approaches into the fine arts curricula at the School of Art and Design at Alfred University where she was Professor of Print and Digital Media for 27 years. During her tenure there she Co- founded The Institute for Electronic Arts and Chaired the Division of Expanded Media and the Electronic Integrated MFA Program. 

In 2004, Jessie became the Dean of Graduate Studies at The Rhode Island School of Design where she worked with faculty and graduate student populations from around the globe to build interdisciplinary curricula. In 2008, she assumed the post of Provost at RISD and led the school in this capacity for three years. During this time she became more and more interested in ideas around leadership, action and change and how live, renewable systems can become the foundation for innovation. 

While at Alfred, she received the Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, conferred by the State of New York through the State University of New York in Albany, NY. And more recently received the ‘Rhode Island Women in Higher Education Outstanding Leadership Award’.

Jessie's work has been exhibited in the United States, Europe and China. Venues include: The Brooklyn Museum of Art, Brooklyn, NY; P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center, Museum of Modern Art affiliate, Long Island City, NY; The Boston Cyberarts Festival, Boston, MA; The Beijing International New Media Exhibition, Beijing, China and most recently at BS1 Contemporary Art Center, Beijing.

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Advisory Council, Visiting Artist

Homa Shojaie

Born in Iran and based in Singapore, with backgrounds in painting, architecture, and installation, Space is Homa’s primary area interest: the space held within things, the space around things, and the space materialized in or on things.

Her persisting questions at this moment are: What is home? What is an image of an image? What is not a painting? 

She studied architecture at The Cooper Union and fine arts at LaSalle College of the Arts, has taught at Pratt Institute, Illinois Institute of Technology, School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and LaSalle College of The Arts in Singapore. She has exhibited in Chicago, New York, Izmir, Kashan, and Singapore. 

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Advisory Council

Frank Wilson

Frank Wilson made the care of performing artists, and other professionals whose work depends on what they do with their hands, the focus of his research and neurological practice for over 25 years.   Through his many collaborations, publications, and presentations he has been influential in bringing researchers, practitioners, and educators in a broad range of disciplines into closer theoretical and practical contact.  He has served as Visiting Professor of Neurology at the University of Düsseldorf; Medical Director of the Health Program for Performing Artists at the University of California, San Francisco; and Clinical Professor of Neurology at Stanford University School of Medicine. He is the author of The Hand: How Its Use Shapes the Brain, Language, and Human Culture, published by Pantheon Books in 1998; he was awarded an Honorary Doctorate in Fine Arts by the Massachusetts College of Art and Design in Boston in 2012; and was a Goldman Sachs Senior Research Fellow at the Smithsonian Institute’s Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation in 2013.

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