2013

Visiting Artist

Ashley Bathgate

American cellist Ashley Bathgate has been described as an “eloquent new music interpreter”(New York Times) and “a glorious cellist”(The Washington Post) who combines “bittersweet lyricism along with ferocious chops”(New York Magazine). Her “impish ferocity”, “rich tone” and “imaginative phrasing” (New York Times) have made her one of the most sought after performers of her time. The desire to create a dynamic energy exchange with her audience and build upon the ensuing chemistry is a pillar of Bathgate's philosophy as a performer. Dynamism drives her to venture into previously uncharted areas of ground-breaking sounds and techniques, breaking the mold of a cello's traditionally perceived voice. Collaborators and fans alike describe her vitality as nothing short of remarkable and magical for all who are involved. For the past ten years Bathgate was a member of the acclaimed sextet Bang on a Can All-Stars. She is also a member of the chamber music group HOWL, TwoSense with pianist Lisa Moore, and Bonjour, a low-strung, percussive quintet.

In 2015 Bathgate gave the world premiere of What Moves You, a collaborative performance project with jookin’ dance sensation Lil Buck at the Spoleto Festival USA in Charleston, NC, as well as the world premiere of a new Cello Concerto written for her by Kate Moore for the Gaudeamus Festival in Utrecht, NL. Subsequently, she released her debut album featuring a set of works for solo cello, composed by Moore, which was released in 2016 on Cantaloupe Music. That year Bathgate also commissioned the ‘composer collective’ Sleeping Giant to write ASH, a six-movement suite for solo cello. Both ASH and her latest album, 8 Track, featuring new multitrack works by Alex Weiser and Emily Cooley, as well as a new rendition of Steve Reich’s Cello Counterpoint, will be commercially released this coming season. Most recently, she premiered a new evening length work by Michael Gordon, House Music, at the 2018 Cello Biennale in Amsterdam, NL.

Bathgate’s radio/television appearances include performances on BBC Radio 3, WKCR, WMHT, WQXR’s Meet the Composer podcast with Nadia Sirota, NPR’s Performance Today, WYNC’s New Sounds Live, SiriusXM, Late Night and The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon. Her recorded work can be found on Albany Records, Cantaloupe Music, Innova Recordings, La-La Land Records, Naxos, Nonesuch, Starkland and Uffda Records.

Originally from Saratoga Springs, NY, Bathgate began her cello studies with the late Rudolf Doblin, principal cellist and assistant music director of the Buffalo Philharmonic in the 1950’s. After his passing, she resumed her tutelage with Ann Alton at Skidmore College. From there she continued on to study at Bard College with Luis Garcia-Renart (B.M.) and then at the Yale University School of Music with renowned cellist, Aldo Parisot (M.M. & A.D).

Bathgate resides in Saratoga Springs, NY.


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Board of Directors, Visiting Artist

Michael Benson

Michael Benson works at the intersection of art and science. A photographer, writer, filmmaker, book-maker, and exhibitions producer, in the last decade he has staged a series of increasingly large-scale shows of planetary landscape photography internationally. Benson takes raw data from NASA and European Space Agency archives and processes it, creating large-format landscapes. He edits, composites, then frequently mosaics, and then finally optimizes these images, producing seamless digital C prints of landscapes beyond direct human experience. He is also an award-winning filmmaker, with work that straddles the boundary between fiction and documentary practice.

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Visiting Artist

Ilya Bernstein

Ilya Bernstein, born in Moscow, is a poet and translator, living in the nether-reaches of northern Manhattan. He is the translator of books by Italian architectural theorist Remo Guidieri, including Argonautics, and has also translated poetry and children's stories by Daniil Kharms. Ilyas poetry, prose, and translations have appeared in Ars Interpres,Circumference, Fulcrum, 6x6, Persephone, Moon City Review, and Res. He is the editor of Osip Mandelstam: New Translations (UDP, 2006). 

Visiting artist at Arts Letters & Numbers Summer Workshop 2013 and 2014.

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Alumni Troupe/Fellow

Mauricio Cortes

Mauricio Cortes Ortega is a Mexican-American multidisciplinary artist living and working in New York. His work explores and questions the intricacies of colonial Latin America, working in a range of mediums like painting, sculpture and drawing he proposes a narrative of loss hinged on the promise of gain. His work reimagines history by transforming recognizable symbols of famous crowns and textiles, using abstraction he renders subtle presences of emerging figures. Cortes attempts to separate the condition of the physical body and push to augment the psychological consequences of absence. His projects commence with research on specific objects from colonial history, be it known historical crowns like the Crown of the Andes of Colombia or textiles from a certain era and location like the Rio Grande Sarape from the southwest, Cortes looks to history for visual clues to better understand the complex history of colonialism. 

In his 2-d work Cortes pays homage to the colors and style of Mexican textiles. His mark-making closely hugs the surface, the abundance of stripes and colors slow down the read of a tattered history of colonialism, conquest, and crossing. Cortes uses a wide range of media and processes from intaglio printmaking to drawing by hand using oil pastels, bingo markers, spray paint, acrylic paint and ink. The repetition, symmetry, and line-work in the image is akin to weaving, lines bow upward and outward forming structures that sit center in the composition. His sculptural work oscillates between traditional ceramics to found-object installations. His recent clay work uses slab construction to make biomorphic forms comparable to crowns and finished with a deep-black mirror glaze, the sculptures redact the decorative, proposing forgotten and faceless rulers. In his found object sculptures he uses air conditioning units, t-shirts, mannequins and terra-cotta colored siesta men figurines. 

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Visiting Artist

Karin Coonrod

 

Karin Coonrod is a theater maker whose work has been seen and heard across the country and around the world. Born in Chicago with first memories in Noli, Italy, Coonrod studied English at Gordon College in Massachusetts and Theater Directing at Columbia University, where her mentor was Liviu Ciulei.

She founded two theater companies: 1) Arden Party in downtown New York from 1987-1997 which re-imagined the classics (including Ubu Roi, Waiting for Godot, Lear, Romeo and Juliet, Antigone, Marat/Sade et al) and 2) Compagnia de’ Colombari (2004-present) an international company (based in New York) which began a new tradition of theater in Orvieto, Italy with the medieval mystery plays in public spaces (Strangers and Other Angels 2004-2006) as well as a music-theater piece More Or Less I Am (from Walt Whitman’s Song of Myself) performed around New York City.

Coonrod is known for her Shakespeare productions including her epic Henry VI (1996) and surprising Love’s Labor’s Lost (2011) both at the Public Theater (where she was Artist-in-Residence from 1995-96); King John (2000), Julius Caesar (2003) and Coriolanus (2005) all with Theatre for a New Audience; Othello at Hartford Stage (2005) and many others.

Other seminal productions include her own creation for the stage of non-dramatic material: Flannery O’Connor’s Everything That Rises Must Converge developed at the University of Iowa, Sundance Theatre Lab and premiered at New York Theatre Workshop (2001), Anne Sexton’s Transformations with Arden Party (1991-5) and a cabaret adaptation of Lorca’s Poeta en Nueva York with flamenco dancer La Conja at New York University (2002).

She prepared new translations: Vvedensky’s Christmas at the Ivanovs’ with Julia Listengarten (1996); Lorca’s The House of Bernarda Alba with Nilo Cruz (1997); and Victor or Children Take Over with Frederic Maurin (1994), all of which she directed in acclaimed productions.

Coonrod’s work is featured in American Theatre Magazine, Shakespeare Bulletin, Sipario nel Mondo (Italian theater journal), Scena.Ro (Romanian theater magazine).

As a guest artist/teacher Coonrod has developed work at NYU, Harvard, Stanford, Columbia, Cal Institute of the Arts, Fordham, Colgate, Gordon College and Univ of Iowa. She is on the faculty at Yale School of Drama (since 2002).

Visiting artist at Arts Letters & Numbers 2013.

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Visiting Artist

Sina Goudarzi


Sina Goudarzi, a native of Iran, has been involved with the art of Persian calligraphy for over 30 years. He attended the Iranian School of Calligraphy in Tehran studying with grand masters including Amirkhani, Kabuli and the late Arabshahi. After graduating in 1986, he went on to become an official instructor at the School.

In the late 80's, Sina studied and worked with the distinguished Grand Master Mohammad Ehsaee, expanding his knowledge of various styles and schools of calligraphy and refining his own practice. Sina's work has been greatly influenced by this grand master. 

In 1998, Sina graduated from the Minneapolis College of Art+Design (MCAD). In 2002, he founded his own firm, Geesu Art+Design and opened his associated art gallery in Minneapolis shortly thereafter.

In the course of his career, Sina has dedicated his energies to outreach and teaching. In addition to participating in numerous calligraphy exhibitions, he also has lectured and conducted workshops on the subject of Persian calligraphy in Houston, Minneapolis, Washington DC and Tehran.

In his design work, Sina combines his fine art background with extensive research and innovative methodologies to develop brand identities. By assessing the client's product, its audiences and niche market, a cultural concept emerges. His designs are the culmination of brand culture and concept.

Sina's work is found in private collections in Tehran, London, Geneva, Amsterdam, Houston, Dallas, New York, Washington DC, Chicago, Los Angeles and Minneapolis.

Visiting artist at Arts Letters & Numbers Summer Workshop 2012 and 2013.


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Visiting Artist

Mandel Hitzer

Mandel has been cooking for more than half his life. The 31 year old got his start at Glutton's under Makoto Ono. In 2010 he paired up with Cyrus Smith and brought the term "pop-up" to Winnipeg, hosting "secret dinners" to help explore their skills and ideas. in 2011, Mandel opened deer + almond, giving him a stage to bring different concepts to Winnipeg food lovers.

Visiting artist at Arts Letters & Numbers Summer Workshop 2013.

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Alumni Troupe/Fellow

Jesse Kreuzer

As a boy, I told my mother that an adventure is when you are almost bitten by a wolf. In my work, my playfulness is given substance through risk. Balance and weight are constant themes. The pull of the earth, the vibrations between images, the space between objects and the emotional forces of current events are all opportunities for adventure and exploration.
I grew up with an obsessive-compulsiveness for "body equilibrium" (right arm gets bumped => left arm is bumped to equal it) that is now manifest in my art practice as a desire for balance that is different than symmetry, but still compulsive. My drawings are struggles to find a compositional balance. My performances are physical searches and demonstrations of it. My sculptures use balance as structural imperatives. Balance is required both to dance gracefully and to thrash wildly...
I try to understand why I want to make things through the process of making them. Drawings become structures, structures become symbols and personal narratives emerge. Each structural event adds meaning- The weight breaks through a cage; the weight floats above the ground; the weight is dragged through a city. In performances I move through buildings without touching the ground and create intimacy between myself and a space- I know details of hallways, doors, the tops of walls because I have measured them with my body. 
My body is the point of reference for my drawings. Visual style is manipulated like materials, like stone and wood, leveraged against each other and built into compositions around bodily forms. The format of facing pages in my sketchbooks- the series of diptychs- emphasizes this diversity of stylistic material. Different positions are taken, tried out, obfuscated. When I draw I open myself up to all possible images- I'm riffing and mixing from memory, magazines, porn, from art history and how-to-put-your-cabinet-together manuals, the round stretch and itch of cartoons and the incidental still-life of crumpled paper in front of me to make kaleidoscopic mash-ups of crudeness and grace. 
Like someone falling down the side of a mountain, grabbing at vines, I'm trying to show something anxiously candid. Keeping between the dual electric-fence of too cheesy and too hip, I veto anything dishonest. The path through my books is linear even when it folds back on itself, like the route through a labyrinth, or the drawing a rock makes through a city, or the path across walls and above the floor. I let the lines lead me like the architecture leads me like the materials and their physical limitations lead me: to honest places.

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Visiting Artist

Lisa Landrum

In between her undergraduate and graduate studies, Lisa performed seven years of diverse architectural work in New York City and earned her professional license in New York State. She is a registered member of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (RAIC), the Manitoba Association of Architects (MAA), and Architecture for Humanity (AfH).

Lisa has been an Assistant Professor in the Department of Architecture at the University of Manitoba since 2008, having previously taught at McGill University in Montreal, Carleton University in Ottawa, Norwich University in Vermont, and at international summer workshops in Rotterdam and Helsinki. She teaches vertical design studios, graduate seminars and undergraduate lectures in the History and Theory of Modern and Pre-modern Architecture.

Dr. Lisa Landrum completed her PhD in the History and Theory of Architecture at McGill University in 2010. Her dissertation explores the mythic bases and poetic origins of architectural acts by interpreting two ancient Greek plays in which the protagonist is called “architect” while directing a scheme of transformation for the common good. These architect-protagonists and the plots they lead not only provide insight into the emergent role of architects in the fifth century BCE, but also vividly dramatize certain representative deeds and ethical dilemmas that remain (to this day) integral to an architect's performance.

Lisa’s research, more generally, encompasses topics in history, theory and design, including: architectural representation, especially dramatic modes of representation implicit in architectural work; representations of architects in drama (from Aristophanes to Ionesco); stories and myths about architectural beginnings; the reciprocity of theatre and architecture, as well as literature and architecture; the creative role of metaphor for architects; and phenomenological, hermeneutic and humanities-based approaches to interpreting contemporary architecture. Lisa has presented aspects of her research at various international conferences. Her publications include two book chapters: “Performing Theoria: Architectural Acts in Aristophanes’ Peace” in Architecture as a Performing Art; and “Ensemble Performances: Architects and Justice in Athenian Drama” in Architecture and Justice: Judicial Meanings in the Public Realm. Other publications include “History and Histrionics: Dramatizing Architectural Inquiry” in Made: Design Education & the Art of Making (University of North Carolina, 2010). Lisa is a member of the Architectural Humanities Research Association (AHRA), the Society of Architectural Historians (SAH), and the International Society for the Philosophy of Architecture (ISPA).

Lisa’s creative research also involves devising ephemeral events, including a series of group costumes and pageantry devices that have been collaboratively constructed and performed in public parades. Lisa has exhibited this work, which explores the political and ritual dimensions of collective aesthetic experience, in New York, Berlin, Montreal and Winnipeg.

Visiting artist at Arts Letters & Numbers Summer Workshop 2013.

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Visiting Artist

Ted Landrum

Ted Landrum (b 1968) has practised and taught architecture in the United States and Canada. From the beginning, poetry has played a vital role in this creative and critical work. Ted is currently preparing a collection of "archi-poems" called Midway Radicals. These – and other artistic projects – probe the productive terrain between architecture and poetry, and between myriad other topics, places and agencies that are usually kept categorically distinct.

Visiting artist at Arts Letters & Numbers Summer Workshop 2013.

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Visiting Artist

Kyna Leski

Kyna Leski is a founding principal of 3SIXØ Architecture. 3six0 bases its practice upon a redefinition of a given problem, setting in play the direction and momentum of a solution that is tailored to the specific situation of each project. The Rhode Island AIA has bestowed its top honors on 3SIXØ 17 times and the Boston Society of Architects has awarded 3SIXØ four times. In 2002 Architectural Record named 3SIXØ one of ten “vanguard” architecture firms emerging worldwide and in 2008 Architectural Record recognized 3SIXØ for “Record Interiors.” Faith and Form awarded their chapel design in 2009.  Kyna's design for a house of visual shadows, which she calls, “Dream House” was awarded first place out of 480 entries in the Shinkenchiku Residential Design Competition in 1998. Architect Shin Takamatsu, the author of the theme of that year’s competition, “A House as a Poetic Space,” and judge of the competition, stated, “. . . the project by Kyna Leski was outstanding. Light undergoes variations and dislocations and becomes architecture. It is an architecture, which resembles the topography of light. The process undergoes both interruptions and leaps forward. Each moment it becomes more complex, and attains a new depth of beauty. The architecture is woven into it. It is true poetry.”This project was published in Modern House 2 by Claire Melhuish (Phaidon Press, 2004). In 1997 the Architectural League of New York selected Kyna Leski as a winner of its annual “Young Architects Competition.” 

Kyna Leski is a Professor of Architecture at the Rhode Island School of Design. She is the author of the first semester architecture design curriculum, given for seventeen years to over 1600 students. A book on this pedagogy, The Making of Design Principles, was published in 2007. Professor Leski has taught Architecture, Foundation Studies and Industrial Design and served as the head of the RISD European Honors Program in Rome from 1993 to 1995. The primary focus of her teaching research is the creative process and its workings across a broad spectrum of disciplines. Currently, she is writing a book, called Storm's-eye View: Tracing the Creative Arc.  


Statement by Kyna Leski:

“I explore, witness, and practice the creative process through my work and my teaching. As a child, I was reprimanded for “getting bored easily,” and now I see that weakness, like all “weaknesses,” as a strength. (Getting bored keeps me moving ahead.) I live in a city whose name, (“pro-videre”) signifies what creativity is: a process of “seeing ahead.” We "see ahead" when we make designs that are materialized in the future, when we write problems that anticipate solutions, when we link one step to another in navigating our lives and the way through anything, especially the empty page, writer’s block, confusion, chaos, needs, and questions. The creative process is the story of this passage and speaks for the author, to the user, the reader, inhabitant, audience or viewer. I have listened and observed these workings as a teacher, a student, a maker, a writer and an architect myself. As an educator I am dedicated to embodied learning, to the precision of mind that comes from measured making and to the clarity of abstraction. As a student, an aspiring/practicing actor and witness I seek to learn something, to be surprised by the author’s soul voice and to find coherence where there wasn’t any. As a maker of things, designer, and writer, I dwell in uncertainty, follow poetry as a process, reason with material, construct, deconstruct and reconstruct—conceptual clarity appearing as a guide. I watch the sunrise almost everyday from a rowing shell, am moved to tears by honesty, and take dreams very seriously.”
 

Kyna Leski earned a B.Arch from The Cooper Union School of Architecture in 1985 and M.Arch from Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design in 1988. She is an avid rower who can be found most mornings before dawn on the Seekonk River and Narragansett Bay in Providence.

Visiting artist at Arts Letters & Numbers Summer Workshop 2013.

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Visiting Artist

Evan Cory Levine

Evan Cory Levine is an entertainer, producer, and electronics whiz living in Philadelphia, PA. Since moving to the city in 2011, he has become an in-demand guitarist and vocalist for numerous ensembles specializing in jazz music of the 1920's, including The Josh Fialkoff Quartet, The Perseverance Jazz Band, Drew Nugent & The Midnight Society, and the Red Hot Ramblers. Levine also leads his own groups, performs in The Mahogany Stompers, a duo with percussionist Julius Masri, and The Howling Kettles, an old-timey trio with members spread across the United States.

Levine is also an active producer, has worked extensively as a live sound technician, and builds electronic equipment to use in his home studio and in his solo experimental project, Our Boy.

Visiting artist at Arts Letters & Numbers Summer Workshop 2013.

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Visiting Artist

Christine Rose

I was born in Sydney Australia and gained a very meagre education by the time I was 16. At that point I thought perhaps I would learn more by leaving formal education and living a life. Therefore I worked until I had enough money to leave Australia and travel to London and here I learnt about life. Fast forward another 12 years and I went to university and read English. Here I discovered a love affair with poetry which has continued ever since. So for the last 25 odd years I have been reading discussing and enjoying poetry. So given half a chance I will share all  I know with like minded people. I am also enchanted by life stories and urge you to tell me yours.

Visiting artist at Arts Letters & Numbers Summer Workshop 2013, Sessions 2018.

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Yoshi Sergel

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Visiting Artist

Anne West

Anne West is an educator, writer, and independent curator with a lifelong interest in creativity. Her research focuses on phenomenology and interpretive human studies, including poetics and mapping. With a Ph.D. in Arts and Media Studies from the University of Toronto, she is Senior Critic, Division of Graduate Studies, at Rhode Island School of Design. West is a Fellow of Syracuse University. Her interpretive projects have been featured on C.B.C. Radio, in catalogue essays for museums and galleries in Canada and the United States, in art journals, as well as through initiatives with numerous art schools, The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, The Big Picture Company, and Fetzer Institute.

Visiting artist at Arts Letters & Numbers Summer Workshop 2013.

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Alumni Troupe/Fellow

Rebecca Woodmass

Rebecca is the Founder of Quill Creative, and the Co-Director of the Montreal chapter of Lesbians Who Tech. She is a classical singer, full-stack, self-taught web developer and designer, writer and activist. She believes that "cultural production and self-expression can and should be used to build new alternatives to the current dominant ideologies of patriarchy, capitalism, and white supremacy." 

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Pronouns: She/Her or They/Them

Photo by Zelé Angelides

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