2014

Visiting Artist

Tracey Eve Winton

Tracey Eve Winton is an architect and iconographer who holds a Ph.D. in the History and Philosophy of Architecture from Cambridge University, and an M. Arch. in the History and Theory of Architecture from McGill. 

She is the winner of two international teaching awards: in 2018 the NCBDS (National Council on the Beginning Design Student) presented her with their annual Faculty award, and in 2014 the ACSA (Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture) gave her their Creative Achievement Award. She is a Research-Creation Scholar with SSHRC (Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada). 

Tracey has taught Design Studio and Italian Urban in the Waterloo Rome Program since 2002, as well as leading an annual 10 day North Field Trip to multiple Italian cities and monuments, and she has published and lectured extensively on Rome and Italian topics. Recent graduate seminars include Modern Vernacular: Resources of Architectural Language. She also teaches elective topics and Cultural History courses, whose projects have included full theatrical productions and an Alternate Reality Game. These projects utilize contemporary media, diversity, and collective intelligence, to explore ideas about architecture, spatial design, the body, and landscape. Tracey has worked in offices in Toronto, Montreal, and London, and her laneway house in Toronto was selected for The Conference on Innovative Housing at Yale University in 1993, and featured on the cover of Canadian Architect. 

Tracey has lectured on architecture in Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and North America, been an editor of The Fifth ColumnAlphabet City, and Journal of Research and Application in Architecture and Urbanism, and is editing a translation of the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili (1499) and a critical commentary. Her upcoming publications (2018) include an architectural reading of the famous Renaissance library in the ducal palace at Urbino, and an essay on Peter Greenaway's film, The Belly of An Architect, in relation to the architecture of Rome. 

Her other research interests include the creative imagination and its relation to history; architectural language in the work of Carlo Scarpa; Roman urbanism, landscape morphology in Renaissance painting; the role of materials in natural magic and alchemy; history and iconography of the museum; ruins, architectural spoils, and adaptive reuse; and self-built housing. 

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Alumni Troupe/Fellow

Jesse Kreuzer

As a boy, I told my mother that an adventure is when you are almost bitten by a wolf. In my work, my playfulness is given substance through risk. Balance and weight are constant themes. The pull of the earth, the vibrations between images, the space between objects and the emotional forces of current events are all opportunities for adventure and exploration.
I grew up with an obsessive-compulsiveness for "body equilibrium" (right arm gets bumped => left arm is bumped to equal it) that is now manifest in my art practice as a desire for balance that is different than symmetry, but still compulsive. My drawings are struggles to find a compositional balance. My performances are physical searches and demonstrations of it. My sculptures use balance as structural imperatives. Balance is required both to dance gracefully and to thrash wildly...
I try to understand why I want to make things through the process of making them. Drawings become structures, structures become symbols and personal narratives emerge. Each structural event adds meaning- The weight breaks through a cage; the weight floats above the ground; the weight is dragged through a city. In performances I move through buildings without touching the ground and create intimacy between myself and a space- I know details of hallways, doors, the tops of walls because I have measured them with my body. 
My body is the point of reference for my drawings. Visual style is manipulated like materials, like stone and wood, leveraged against each other and built into compositions around bodily forms. The format of facing pages in my sketchbooks- the series of diptychs- emphasizes this diversity of stylistic material. Different positions are taken, tried out, obfuscated. When I draw I open myself up to all possible images- I'm riffing and mixing from memory, magazines, porn, from art history and how-to-put-your-cabinet-together manuals, the round stretch and itch of cartoons and the incidental still-life of crumpled paper in front of me to make kaleidoscopic mash-ups of crudeness and grace. 
Like someone falling down the side of a mountain, grabbing at vines, I'm trying to show something anxiously candid. Keeping between the dual electric-fence of too cheesy and too hip, I veto anything dishonest. The path through my books is linear even when it folds back on itself, like the route through a labyrinth, or the drawing a rock makes through a city, or the path across walls and above the floor. I let the lines lead me like the architecture leads me like the materials and their physical limitations lead me: to honest places.

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Yoshi Sergel

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Alumni Troupe/Fellow

Peeraya Suphasidh

"I trust in the assembly of things in space and their abilities to provoke new apparatus onto the lived ambiances. 
I wish to learn and advance the methodology of creating these things; the essence and the process of their
becoming. By meditated means of explorations, at many different levels, certain things become clearer while
other fades away. Points of departures and point of pauses, all interconnected, leads to both constructed and
imaginative ends. I'm interested in the process, more so of capturing its trajectories. Like millions of butterflies in mid-air at the same time, all pinned at different points in space - we look at them from different spectrums of the looking glass. The expanse of the possibilities is extremely alluring; the speculation of space limitless."

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Alumni Troupe/Fellow

Rebecca Woodmass

Rebecca is the Founder of Quill Creative, and the Co-Director of the Montreal chapter of Lesbians Who Tech. She is a classical singer, full-stack, self-taught web developer and designer, writer and activist. She believes that "cultural production and self-expression can and should be used to build new alternatives to the current dominant ideologies of patriarchy, capitalism, and white supremacy." 

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Pronouns: She/Her or They/Them

Photo by Zelé Angelides

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