Writer

Visiting Artist

Adam Tedesco

Adam Tedesco is an editor of REALITY BEACH, a journal of new poetics. His recent work has appeared or is forthcoming in Laurel Review, Gramma Weekly, Prelude, Pouch, Powderkeg, Fanzine, Fence, and elsewhere. His video work has been exhibited at MoMA PS1 among other venues. He is the author of several chapbooks, most recently ABLAZA (Lithic Press, 2017), as well as the forthcoming titles Misrule (Usrus Americanus Press, 2019), and Mary Oliver (Lithic Press, 2019). 

Visiting artist performing at Arts Letters & Numbers 2018.

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Board of Directors, Visiting Artist

Michael Benson

Michael Benson works at the intersection of art and science. A photographer, writer, filmmaker, book-maker, and exhibitions producer, in the last decade he has staged a series of increasingly large-scale shows of planetary landscape photography internationally. Benson takes raw data from NASA and European Space Agency archives and processes it, creating large-format landscapes. He edits, composites, then frequently mosaics, and then finally optimizes these images, producing seamless digital C prints of landscapes beyond direct human experience. He is also an award-winning filmmaker, with work that straddles the boundary between fiction and documentary practice.

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Advisory Council, Visiting Artist

Diane DeBlois

With a background in teaching English and Drama, Diane researches, edits and writes about the stuff of ordinary life … and gathers people to animate their stories.

Visiting artist at Arts Letters & Numbers Summer Workshops 2015 - 2018, Oppenheimers Table 2015, Information Poverty 2017, Sessions 2018 - 2019.

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Advisory Council, Visiting Artist

Remo Guidieri

Studied with Claude Levi-Strass and did field-works in: South-east Melanesia, Central Polynesia. Has been Professor in anthropology and aesthetics, Paris since 1972; Visiting Professor, Irwin Chanin School of Architecture, Cooper Union, New York, since 1989; co-founder (1981) of Res, Journal of Anthropology and Aesthetics, Harvard, Mass. Author of countless essays and books, published in France, Italy, Spain, Mexico, Rumania, Germany, and USA. Recent titles include: Argonautics, Pièges & Outils (Traps & Tools), 2007; Miroir du vestibule (Mirror of the vestibule) 2009; Géométrie sauvage (Savage Geometry) 2010. On Loan and Sacrifice, Too Late, Too Early.

Visiting artist at Arts Letters & Numbers 2012, 2013 and 2015. 

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Advisory Council, Visiting Artist

Ed Keller

Director of the Center for Transformative Media at The New School, and Associate Professor at Parsons School of Design.  Designer, professor, writer, musician and multimedia artist.  Prior to joining Parsons, he taught at Columbia Univ. GSAPP [1998-2010] and SCIArc [2004-09].   With Carla Leitao he co-founded AUM Studio, an architecture and new media firm that has produced residential projects, competitions, and new media installations in Europe and the US.   His work and writing has appeared widely, in venues including Punctum, Praxis, ANY,  AD,  Arquine,  Leonardo Electronic Almanac,  Architecture,  Precis,  Wired,  Metropolis,  Assemblage, Ottagono, and Progressive Architecture.  He has spoken on architecturefilmtechnology and ecology internationally.  Ongoing courses at Parsons include Design for this Century,  Post-Planetary Design  and The Radical Future of Guitar.  Ed has been an avid rockclimber for over 35 years.

Visiting artist at Arts Letters & Numbers Summer Workshop 2013, 2015, 2017, 2018

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Visiting Artist

Kyna Leski

Kyna Leski is a founding principal of 3SIXØ Architecture. 3six0 bases its practice upon a redefinition of a given problem, setting in play the direction and momentum of a solution that is tailored to the specific situation of each project. The Rhode Island AIA has bestowed its top honors on 3SIXØ 17 times and the Boston Society of Architects has awarded 3SIXØ four times. In 2002 Architectural Record named 3SIXØ one of ten “vanguard” architecture firms emerging worldwide and in 2008 Architectural Record recognized 3SIXØ for “Record Interiors.” Faith and Form awarded their chapel design in 2009.  Kyna's design for a house of visual shadows, which she calls, “Dream House” was awarded first place out of 480 entries in the Shinkenchiku Residential Design Competition in 1998. Architect Shin Takamatsu, the author of the theme of that year’s competition, “A House as a Poetic Space,” and judge of the competition, stated, “. . . the project by Kyna Leski was outstanding. Light undergoes variations and dislocations and becomes architecture. It is an architecture, which resembles the topography of light. The process undergoes both interruptions and leaps forward. Each moment it becomes more complex, and attains a new depth of beauty. The architecture is woven into it. It is true poetry.”This project was published in Modern House 2 by Claire Melhuish (Phaidon Press, 2004). In 1997 the Architectural League of New York selected Kyna Leski as a winner of its annual “Young Architects Competition.” 

Kyna Leski is a Professor of Architecture at the Rhode Island School of Design. She is the author of the first semester architecture design curriculum, given for seventeen years to over 1600 students. A book on this pedagogy, The Making of Design Principles, was published in 2007. Professor Leski has taught Architecture, Foundation Studies and Industrial Design and served as the head of the RISD European Honors Program in Rome from 1993 to 1995. The primary focus of her teaching research is the creative process and its workings across a broad spectrum of disciplines. Currently, she is writing a book, called Storm's-eye View: Tracing the Creative Arc.  


Statement by Kyna Leski:

“I explore, witness, and practice the creative process through my work and my teaching. As a child, I was reprimanded for “getting bored easily,” and now I see that weakness, like all “weaknesses,” as a strength. (Getting bored keeps me moving ahead.) I live in a city whose name, (“pro-videre”) signifies what creativity is: a process of “seeing ahead.” We "see ahead" when we make designs that are materialized in the future, when we write problems that anticipate solutions, when we link one step to another in navigating our lives and the way through anything, especially the empty page, writer’s block, confusion, chaos, needs, and questions. The creative process is the story of this passage and speaks for the author, to the user, the reader, inhabitant, audience or viewer. I have listened and observed these workings as a teacher, a student, a maker, a writer and an architect myself. As an educator I am dedicated to embodied learning, to the precision of mind that comes from measured making and to the clarity of abstraction. As a student, an aspiring/practicing actor and witness I seek to learn something, to be surprised by the author’s soul voice and to find coherence where there wasn’t any. As a maker of things, designer, and writer, I dwell in uncertainty, follow poetry as a process, reason with material, construct, deconstruct and reconstruct—conceptual clarity appearing as a guide. I watch the sunrise almost everyday from a rowing shell, am moved to tears by honesty, and take dreams very seriously.”
 

Kyna Leski earned a B.Arch from The Cooper Union School of Architecture in 1985 and M.Arch from Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design in 1988. She is an avid rower who can be found most mornings before dawn on the Seekonk River and Narragansett Bay in Providence.

Visiting artist at Arts Letters & Numbers Summer Workshop 2013.

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Alumni Troupe/Fellow

Sabrina Sadique

Sabrina Sadique came to the United States from Dhaka, Bangladesh to study Chemistry and advance her training in the Natural Sciences, but a course with Professor Sara Suleri Goodyear on Urdu poets and images of the “Orient” in English Romantic poetry convinced her to switch focus to English Literature in the midst of her third year of undergraduate studies. Winner of the Francis Bergen Memorial Prize for Fiction awarded by the Yale Literary Magazine and the Elmore A. Willetz Prize for Fiction awarded by the English department, Sadique received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Yale University with distinction in the major. She completed two undergraduate theses: a critical thesis that probed the concept of hybridity through the historical abrogation of the satanic verses from the Qur’ān and their literary reconstruction in Salman Rushdie's novel The Satanic Verses, and a creative thesis that comprised a collection of short fictional stories rooted in Dhaka, the city where she was born and raised. Novelist Amy Bloom and poet J.D. McClatchy supervised her story collection.
 
Sadique is currently completing her PhD in Global Anglophone Literature in the English Department at Harvard University under the guidance of Shakespeare scholar Marjorie Garber, literary critic James Wood, comparative cultural theorist Biodun Jeyifo, and poet/critic Stephen Burt. Sadique’s doctoral dissertation compares literary formulations of gender and Islam between the postcolonial and post-9/11 narrative modes with an emphasis on issues of globalization and Muslim diaspora. It engages psychoanalytic techniques for understanding terrorism and trauma through memoirs published in the United States after the attack on the World Trade Center.
 
At Harvard, Sadique has taught undergraduate courses that ranged from the study of theater, psychoanalysis, and Shakespeare to Science Fiction and Postwar American and British Fiction. Distinguished by Harvard’s Derek Bok Teaching Center for her pedagogic contributions, Sadique has received the Francis James Child Prize for excellence in teaching her advanced undergraduate English course “Gender, Sex, Nation,” a version of which was taught to male inmates at a correctional facility in Connecticut through the Wesleyan Center of Prison Education. Sadique was also nominated for the Joseph R. Levenson Memorial Teaching Prize for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching by the Harvard Undergraduate Council.
 
A former House Director of the Stanford Summer Session, Assistant Dean of the General Program of Harvard Summer Programs, and Resident Tutor in English and Race Relations at Dunster House, Sadique is now looking forward to building a sustainable cabin in New England woods, writing fiction and Sufi poetry, and teaching literature to those without access to higher education. Paradise Lost, King Lear, The Book of Job, T.S. Eliot's The Four Quartets, and Rilke’s The Duino Elegies are her favorite texts. In her spare time, Sadique translates unexplored Bengali literature into English, interprets scriptures from disparate theological traditions, and goes on unmapped hikes to collect geodes. Upon submission of her PhD thesis, she hopes to hold a fistful of Himalayan and Kilimanjaro snow and complete pilgrimages to the Kaaba in Mecca and the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela in Galicia. 

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Visiting Artist

Ginger Teppner

I am a writer of both poetry and prose. I allow for the possibility that poetry and prose are complete only when conjoined, existing in time and space together, unable to be separate. Start with form and content must erupt. Start with content; form is manifest. It is not about appearing clever. It is about ultimate connection and the possibility of sneaking under the trip wire of pre-thought. It is about writing around the thickness of expectation.
For the first time the concept of poet/writer as time mechanic resonates completely, as I become less and less interested in definition unless it pertains to intent. I become estranged from the questions of what does this mean and where is this going? Who I am now becomes a reflection of who I am now exemplified in the spaces present between the words and lines and contours and time and location. All artifacts exist at the same time in conversation with each other. Without aggression, suspended by curiousity, and with total appreciation for the collective and divine, form finds an innocent page, right place, and closest representation. A definition of artifice: below the referential, sonic, and spacial is another atmosphere with an undercurrent that defies narrative and logic, the ineffable unknown.

Visiting artist at Arts Letters & Numbers Summer Workshop 2012, 2014, 2017 and 2018.

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Visiting Artist

Anne West

Anne West is an educator, writer, and independent curator with a lifelong interest in creativity. Her research focuses on phenomenology and interpretive human studies, including poetics and mapping. With a Ph.D. in Arts and Media Studies from the University of Toronto, she is Senior Critic, Division of Graduate Studies, at Rhode Island School of Design. West is a Fellow of Syracuse University. Her interpretive projects have been featured on C.B.C. Radio, in catalogue essays for museums and galleries in Canada and the United States, in art journals, as well as through initiatives with numerous art schools, The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, The Big Picture Company, and Fetzer Institute.

Visiting artist at Arts Letters & Numbers Summer Workshop 2013.

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