Alumni Troupe/Fellow

Alumni Troupe/Fellow, Visiting Artist

Tine Bernstorff Aagaard

Tine Bernstorff Aagaard Studied architecture at Aarhus School of Architecture, Denmark, and graduated in 2010 with distinction on her thesis project. During her education she has assisted Berlin-based artist Michel de Broin and worked for architecture company R&Sie(n) in Paris.

Throughout her education she has been involved in EASA (European Architecture Students Assembly) in which she together with companion Emilie Bergrem taught a workshop exploring basic relation between body and space by ‘modifying’ the body with prosthetics to challenge our conventional beliefs of how the surroundings adapt to the body and vice versa.

The same theme was explored in their installation "1:14" a suspended labyrinth in the Spring Exhibition in Charlottenborg, Copenhagen, Denmark.
 
Since graduating, she has taught first year at the Aarhus School of Architecture in architecture, drawing, and representation. Now she lives and works in Cape Town, South Africa.

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Alumni Troupe/Fellow

Amara Abdal Figueroa

Amara Abdal Figueroa (b. 1990, Puerto Rico) graduated from the Rhode Island School of Design in 2013, earning both a BFA and B.Arch. In 2012 and 2013, Amara contributed in the restoration of a 19th Century coffee plantation in Medellin, Colombia, which became Campos de Gutierrez- an international residency program. There, she worked on studio development for residing artists. In upstate New York, Amara is working on Arts Letters and Numbers to transform the cotton mill and house into an interdisciplinary space. She is interested in spaces that foment creation.

"How are both of these, once axes of development in their respective areas, the perfect architectural types for the production of coffee, cotton, or visionary works?"

Most recently, Amara took part of the research team of Kuwait's National Pavilion in La Biennale di Venezia di Architettura titled Acquiring Modernity with the objective of investigating the repercussions of commissioning architectural works towards the formation of the State. To help articulate the nation’s history of modernization, the team has chosen to focus it’s participation on the establishment of the Kuwait National Museum specifically through the envisaged program of its second more modern yet defunct iteration. It is an effort to generate meaning and restore a sense of ownership and responsibility over Kuwait's built environment. 

The project is obsessively local and utterly informal despite its appearance at la Biennale; its highest aspiration is to influence authorities so that when the project returns to Kuwait from Venice, it will have found a place inside of the Kuwait National Museum as a sort of ‘Special Projects’ program, or research and documentation center.

Commissioned by the National Council for Culture, Arts and Letters.

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Alumni Troupe/Fellow

Laura Genes

Laura Genes is a recent graduate of The Cooper Union in New York City. She received the 2011 Benjamin Menschel Fellowship with Mauricio Cortes. Along with her brother, Hugo Genes, they traveled to Mato Grosso, Brazil to visit the Pimental Barbosa aldeia of the Xavante Tribe as part of The Nancy Flowers Project; a visual investigation exploring the relationship of photography and it's subject. The Nancy Flowers Project is a collaboration between photojournalist/anthropologist Nancy Flowers (b. 1920) and three young artists, Laura Genes, Hugo Genes and Mauricio Cortes.  Laura has also received the Mark L. Moehlman Prize for Excellence in Writing. Her short essay about Francisco Goya's painting The Forge was published by The Frick Collection.  She is currently developing a student-run literary publication, "The Alphabet" with her classmates Arta Perezic and Kiwi Ngyn. She has interned at Andrew Bartle Architects and more recently at dbox, a branding and creative agency. She visits her homeland of Brazil, as often as she can and when she can't make it to the beach she practices synchronized swimming with her mother Katia on Roosevelt Island.

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Alumni Troupe/Fellow

Daejeong Kim

I am often curious about things.
Small things.
Like a simple line.
A simple line that can tell me about every aspect of the world.
A small miniscule error that caused by either human force or earthly phenomenon.
But I am not a poet.
I am pursuing for being an architect.


I study architecture at Rhode Island School of Design, pursuing Master of Architecture. Before I came to US, I studied architecture at Kyungpook National University, where I received Bachelor of Architecture. I had done internship works at architectural offices in Korea and Boston.

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Alumni Troupe/Fellow, Visiting Artist

Jesse Kreuzer

As a boy, I told my mother that an adventure is when you are almost bitten by a wolf. In my work, my playfulness is given substance through risk. Balance and weight are constant themes. The pull of the earth, the vibrations between images, the space between objects and the emotional forces of current events are all opportunities for adventure and exploration.
I grew up with an obsessive-compulsiveness for "body equilibrium" (right arm gets bumped => left arm is bumped to equal it) that is now manifest in my art practice as a desire for balance that is different than symmetry, but still compulsive. My drawings are struggles to find a compositional balance. My performances are physical searches and demonstrations of it. My sculptures use balance as structural imperatives. Balance is required both to dance gracefully and to thrash wildly...
I try to understand why I want to make things through the process of making them. Drawings become structures, structures become symbols and personal narratives emerge. Each structural event adds meaning- The weight breaks through a cage; the weight floats above the ground; the weight is dragged through a city. In performances I move through buildings without touching the ground and create intimacy between myself and a space- I know details of hallways, doors, the tops of walls because I have measured them with my body. 
My body is the point of reference for my drawings. Visual style is manipulated like materials, like stone and wood, leveraged against each other and built into compositions around bodily forms. The format of facing pages in my sketchbooks- the series of diptychs- emphasizes this diversity of stylistic material. Different positions are taken, tried out, obfuscated. When I draw I open myself up to all possible images- I'm riffing and mixing from memory, magazines, porn, from art history and how-to-put-your-cabinet-together manuals, the round stretch and itch of cartoons and the incidental still-life of crumpled paper in front of me to make kaleidoscopic mash-ups of crudeness and grace. 
Like someone falling down the side of a mountain, grabbing at vines, I'm trying to show something anxiously candid. Keeping between the dual electric-fence of too cheesy and too hip, I veto anything dishonest. The path through my books is linear even when it folds back on itself, like the route through a labyrinth, or the drawing a rock makes through a city, or the path across walls and above the floor. I let the lines lead me like the architecture leads me like the materials and their physical limitations lead me: to honest places.

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Alumni Troupe/Fellow

Diana Mangaser

Diana Mangaser received her Masters of Architecture from Rhode Island School of Design and Bachelor of Arts in Architecture from the University of California, Berkeley. She holds a Sheridan Teaching Certificate from Brown University, and has taught in the Foundation Studies, Art History & Architecture Departments at RISD. She currently teaches within the Media Design Faculty at Hostos Community College, City University of New York. Her studio practice is based in Newburgh, NY where she is part of a growing collaborative Architecture Studio, A R C H. She is involved with the local artist/craftsman community at the studios at Atlas Industries, and she works as the architectural project manager with Newburgh Community Land Bank, a non-profit seeking to revitalize Newburgh through the stabilization and inhabitation of its abandoned buildings. Her current interest in architecture is in the practical application of building within a community, and the transformation of a place through the manifestation of a sub-culture that seeks forgotten spaces as new opportunities for emerging creative practices.

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Visiting Artist, Alumni Troupe/Fellow

Aida Miron

Aida Miron is an architect and artist, whose work is grounded in the fields of architecture, urbanism, critical theory and the visual arts. Her work explores notions of public space, reconstruction, memory and ecology. She has an B.Arch. from the Cooper Union Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture in NYC, a Masters in Architectre from the ETSA-Barcelona in Spain, an MFA from the Kunstakademiet i Trondheim-NTNU in Norway, and a post-graduate diploma in Urban Studies from the Bauhaus-Dessau in Germany.  From 2009-2014, she was instructor of the Architectonics first year design studio at the Cooper Union School of Architecture with Lebbeus Woods and David Gersten, among others. She has lectured, taught workshops, and been a visiting critic in the East Coast and Europe. She is a partner of the landscape design and research studio, La Casona Garden in Miami, Fl, and founder of KoraForms, a studio collaboration with artists, architects, and landscape and lighting designers, founded in Gowanus Brooklyn in 2010. She has worked as a designer and researcher in NYC, Miami, Barcelona, Berlin, Copenhagen, Trondheim and Tromso.

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Alumni Troupe/Fellow

Ché Pérez

Che Perez received his Bachelor's of Architecture from the Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture at Cooper Union. He is a recipient of the William Cooper Mack Thesis Fellowship and the Alumni Award for outstanding service to the school through his activities as an elected member of the Architecture Student Council. 

Che completed his architecture thesis on the possibility of developing an architectural framework that parallels cultural developments in Caribbean literature. Recognizing that the Caribbean carnivalesque simultaneously engages the physical and literary dimensions of that culture; acting as a metabolic catalyst for cultural evolution and an agent for post-colonial identity construction, Che developed an urban archetype that responds, amplifies and captures these transformations into the evolution of the form and program of the city. 

He has interned at architectural practices, namely; ACLA:Works, Mark Raymond Architect and MOCAD in Trinidad, and Eiroa Architects in New York. While at Cooper, he taught a year-round introductory architecture course to New York City high school students as part of the Saturday Program. 

Born in Trinidad and Tobago, Che grew up sailing and sea-scouting and has taken part in national, regional and international competitions and events worldwide. 

Che has been involved in the growth of Arts Letters and Numbers since 2011 and was between 2014 - 2016 a Resident Fellow at its Headquarters in Averill Park, NY. 

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Alumni Troupe/Fellow

Sabrina Sadique

Sabrina Sadique came to the United States from Dhaka, Bangladesh to study Chemistry and advance her training in the Natural Sciences, but a course with Professor Sara Suleri Goodyear on Urdu poets and images of the “Orient” in English Romantic poetry convinced her to switch focus to English Literature in the midst of her third year of undergraduate studies. Winner of the Francis Bergen Memorial Prize for Fiction awarded by the Yale Literary Magazine and the Elmore A. Willetz Prize for Fiction awarded by the English department, Sadique received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Yale University with distinction in the major. She completed two undergraduate theses: a critical thesis that probed the concept of hybridity through the historical abrogation of the satanic verses from the Qur’ān and their literary reconstruction in Salman Rushdie's novel The Satanic Verses, and a creative thesis that comprised a collection of short fictional stories rooted in Dhaka, the city where she was born and raised. Novelist Amy Bloom and poet J.D. McClatchy supervised her story collection.
 
Sadique is currently completing her PhD in Global Anglophone Literature in the English Department at Harvard University under the guidance of Shakespeare scholar Marjorie Garber, literary critic James Wood, comparative cultural theorist Biodun Jeyifo, and poet/critic Stephen Burt. Sadique’s doctoral dissertation compares literary formulations of gender and Islam between the postcolonial and post-9/11 narrative modes with an emphasis on issues of globalization and Muslim diaspora. It engages psychoanalytic techniques for understanding terrorism and trauma through memoirs published in the United States after the attack on the World Trade Center.
 
At Harvard, Sadique has taught undergraduate courses that ranged from the study of theater, psychoanalysis, and Shakespeare to Science Fiction and Postwar American and British Fiction. Distinguished by Harvard’s Derek Bok Teaching Center for her pedagogic contributions, Sadique has received the Francis James Child Prize for excellence in teaching her advanced undergraduate English course “Gender, Sex, Nation,” a version of which was taught to male inmates at a correctional facility in Connecticut through the Wesleyan Center of Prison Education. Sadique was also nominated for the Joseph R. Levenson Memorial Teaching Prize for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching by the Harvard Undergraduate Council.
 
A former House Director of the Stanford Summer Session, Assistant Dean of the General Program of Harvard Summer Programs, and Resident Tutor in English and Race Relations at Dunster House, Sadique is now looking forward to building a sustainable cabin in New England woods, writing fiction and Sufi poetry, and teaching literature to those without access to higher education. Paradise Lost, King Lear, The Book of Job, T.S. Eliot's The Four Quartets, and Rilke’s The Duino Elegies are her favorite texts. In her spare time, Sadique translates unexplored Bengali literature into English, interprets scriptures from disparate theological traditions, and goes on unmapped hikes to collect geodes. Upon submission of her PhD thesis, she hopes to hold a fistful of Himalayan and Kilimanjaro snow and complete pilgrimages to the Kaaba in Mecca and the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela in Galicia. 

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Alumni Troupe/Fellow

Peeraya Suphasidh

"I trust in the assembly of things in space and their abilities to provoke new apparatus onto the lived ambiances. 
I wish to learn and advance the methodology of creating these things; the essence and the process of their
becoming. By meditated means of explorations, at many different levels, certain things become clearer while
other fades away. Points of departures and point of pauses, all interconnected, leads to both constructed and
imaginative ends. I'm interested in the process, more so of capturing its trajectories. Like millions of butterflies in mid-air at the same time, all pinned at different points in space - we look at them from different spectrums of the looking glass. The expanse of the possibilities is extremely alluring; the speculation of space limitless."

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Visiting Artist, Alumni Troupe/Fellow

Anthony Titus

Anthony Titus was born in New York City in 1975, where he studied architecture and received a Bachelor of Architecture from The Cooper Union. He completed his graduate studies in Fine Arts at the University of Chicago in 2001. Upon returning to New York City in 2001he founded an independent studio of art and architectural practice and research.  Since 2002 he has taught architecture at The Cooper Union, Pratt Institute and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He has also acted as an invited guest and critic at Columbia University, Art Center, Parsons, Yale University and Cornell University.

In his 2009 solo exhibition Violence >Silence at Museum 52 in New York City, he exhibited a series of large scale paintings exploring the relationships between abstraction and cultural memory. He ha exhibited in numerous group exhibitions in the United States and abroad and is currently included in The 2010 Kings County Biennial, Brooklyn, New York. He  is currently engaged in writing a book and producing a series of projects which engage and explore  the relationship between contemporary art, philosophy and technology.

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Alumni Troupe/Fellow

Bryan Wilson

Bryan McGovern Wilson is an interdisciplinary artist whose projects address the themes of the time, ecology, the body, and ritual. Bryan received his BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design in 2009 and is the recipient of the 2014 Borowsky Prize in Glass, has served as Artist in Residence in the Everglades through the National Parks Service and is currently a Fellow at The Neiman Center for Print Studies at Columbia University. He lives and works in New York City.

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Alumni Troupe/Fellow

Rebecca Woodmass

Rebecca is the Founder of Quill Creative, and the Co-Director of the Montreal chapter of Lesbians Who Tech. She is a classical singer, full-stack, self-taught web developer and designer, writer and activist. She believes that "cultural production and self-expression can and should be used to build new alternatives to the current dominant ideologies of patriarchy, capitalism, and white supremacy." 

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Pronouns: She/Her or They/Them

Photo by Zelé Angelides

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