Community

Events, Exhibition, Performance, Community, Artist in Residence

Third-Thursday 03 | Monthly Public Participatory Sharing

Thanks to all the support and participation of artists and community, the third edition of Third-Thursday successfully held an enlightening and inspiring exchange in Arts Letters & Numbers. We express great gratitude to following presented artists along with visitors and supporters.

Earl Carlson is an artist and designer. His work explores what makes us human and what we have control over. Earl's primary field of work is getting himself and others into a flow state where they can start to explore those questions in an in depth manner with one another. In his design career he works in large complex systems, currently he is at Facebook on the news team working on the news integrity initiative.

Kristina Kassem is a visual designer and artist. She currently works in branding and identity within the hospitality realm. She's worked with a range of brands and non-profits including The Plaza Hotel, The Global Oneness Project, The William Vale, and Chelsea Piers. As an artist assistant she has worked with Candy Chang to help Candy establish the Before I Die project which has been installed in over 70 countries including Iraq, China, Brazil, and Kazakhstan.

Frida Foberg received her bachelor of arts in architecture from KTH Royal Institute of Technology, followed by her master of arts in architecture from Aarhus School of Architecture in 2013. In 2012 she started her own freelance based practice and has executed several collaborative exhibitions and installations, all with her interest in the interaction between people-art-space-stories. In 2014 she was, in collaboration with Mie Dinesen, granted by the Cultural Affairs Agency of Oslo for their workshop based installations “Rom i Byen for Byen”.

After working for the artist Vito Acconci, and the architect firm VAMOS Architects in NYC, Frida became a Resident Fellow at Arts Letters & Numbers Headquarters in Averill Park, NY in 2015. During her time as a Resident Fellow she has worked closely with the entire ALN community on many elements that contribute to the life of the project and have strengthened the core mission. Frida has recently taken on the role as Associate Director of Arts Letters & Numbers. 

Frida's artistic work evolve around the awareness of how we do what we do, while we are doing it. The context of her work is the daily life, the situations, rooted in culture and personality traits, we might not contemplate upon. Her larger body of work Why Are We Eating Together, is a research on the intersection of these patterns.

John Butkus teaches partner dancing with a focus on the connection and the physical conversation that takes place between two people gliding across the floor as one. John enjoys many types of dance and has a passion for West Coast Swing and Argentine Tango.

A photographer for most of his life, John creates magic from the mundane by capturing the light that bounces off of ordinary objects.

When John’s not dancing, teaching or behind the camera, he runs a software company that specializes in Energy Management, Building Automation Controls and HVAC systems. His expertise is writing code as an art to save energy, one BTU at a time.

Jennifer Park is an artist engaging architecture and humanity based in Brooklyn. With a dual background, US and Republic of Korea, JP has pursued the ways to support people’s lives through drawing, writing, and making. Beyond the boundary of conventional architecture, JP's works open up from trivial observations in everyday life, branching out in a various medium; drawing, painting, poetry, precise, photography, installation, and architecture. 

Jennifer has been educated and practiced architecture since 2007. Graduated from Rhode Island School of Design in 2016, earning M. Arch. JP had worked for Face Design and Fabrication in Brooklyn and Verona Carpenter Architects in lower Manhattan. She recently joined Arts Letters & Numbers, a non-profit organization for artists, as a resident fellow contributing construction and marketing.

Events, Exhibition, Performance, Community, Artist in Residence

Third-Thursday 02 | Monthly Public Participatory Sharing

Thanks to all the support and participation of artists and community, the second edition of Third-Thursday successfully held an enlightening and inspiring exchange in Arts Letters & Numbers. We express great gratitude to following presented artists along with visitors and supporters.

Hyunbae Chang was born in West Lafayette, Indiana, but moved to South Korea at the age of 4. He spent the youth in Seoul and moved back to the US in his sophomore year at high school in Marietta, Georgia. One year after entering Rhode Island School of Design, he served 21 months at the Army of South Korea as a field artillery unit. After he received the B.Arch at RISD, he participated in two summer workshops at Arts Letters and Numbers and decided to stay at the organization to support any construction related issues. Prior to joining ALN, Hyunbae has been drawing a story of a refugee at the border between South and North Korea. Regarding architecture as a social apparatus, he is examining and imagining a story of the doubt and empathy in a culture by drafting the architectural plans and sections, and sometimes projections. 

Reenie Is originally from Lexington, Massachusetts. She received her BA in Communications from Simmons College in Boston, Massachusetts, and her MFA in Studio Arts from Maine College of Art in Portland, Maine She has received two Foundation for Contemporary Arts Grants, and a Roderick Dew Travel Grant. She has been awarded Artist Residencies by Draw-International in France, Hannacc Can Bourni in Spain, Maine College of Art, the La Napoule Art Foundation in France, SF MOMA, Arts Benicia and Vermont Studio. Her work has been exhibited in venues internationally including Galeria Espai B, in Barcelona, 2017, and the Bojagi Forum in Seoul, Korea, 2016, and at the Chateau de la Napoule, Mandelieu-La Napoule, France, 2014 as well as all over the United States. Her work has been commissioned by San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery in 2011, as well as by the Marin Sanitary Service in 2014, and by the Peoria Playhouse Children’s Museum in 2018.

Cara Farnan is a Visual Artist based in Dublin. She is drawn to the space between what we know about the world, and what we sense about it. In this in-between, binaries collapse and definitive edges are lost. Our physical experience becomes irreversibly intertwined with our imaginary experience. Her work stems from a fascination for the inherent magic and quiet monumentality of stuff – observing, and reflecting on the strange quirks of and interactions between often familiar things.Cara works in a variety of forms including sculptural and site-specific installation, sound, text, video, drawing and printmaking. Since graduating with a BA(Hons) in Fine Print from the National College of Art and Design, Dublin in 2016, Cara has completed residencies in the RHA School, Dublin; Haihatus, Finland and Cow House Studios, Wexford. In 2018, Cara curated a one-day exhibition, Gathering on Dollymount Strand and produced Emma Brennan’s performance Heed, to the Mound at Dublin Fringe Festival. She is an active member of artist-led studio Ormond Art Studios and of Black Church Print Studio. Cara works as a STEAM educator alongside her practice, introducing children to the wonders of science, design and technology. Her work has been exhibited throughout Ireland and internationally. 

Pianist Eunbi Kim (pronounced OOn-bee, like book) is creating new ways of experiencing concert music as a performer, speaker, and arts advocate. Her adventurous performances are characterized by their vividly personal themes ranging from mental illness to familial memories. For her efforts, Kim has received international recognition on television and in print, including from the BBC, I Care If You Listen, the Houston Chronicle, The Japan Times, and NHK Television. Kim is most known as the creator, performer, and producer of the music-theater work Murakami Music, for which she is recognized as a leading Murakami expert. Her debut album, A House of Many Rooms released on Albany Records, features a collection of premiere recordings of relatively unknown contemporary classical works by luminary jazz composer Fred Hersch. Kim has shown off her unconventional and immersive performance concepts in venues across the country. Notably, she has performed Emmy-nominated composer Daniel Bernard Roumain’s dedicated work “It Feels Like a Mountain, Chasing Me,” over 50 times across the United States, including its premiere at The Kennedy Center. Off-stage, Kim’s entrepreneurial efforts include launching a music mentorship program for women, transgender, and nonbinary musicians, bespoken, alongside co-founder Gina Izzo in addition to speaking engagements at organizations, universities, and institutions across the country. Her 2017 TEDx talk, “Performing Through Fear,” discusses conquering performance anxiety through learning to trust. Originally from Maryland, Eunbi Kim is based in New York City. She holds a Master of Music degree from the Manhattan School of Music.

Daniel J. Kuperberg

Clare Lyons is a photographer and visual artist based in Dublin, Ireland. Her work is typically deeply private and explores themes of trauma, memory, and her personal struggle with mental illness. Clare's current practice examines the process of uncovering and recalling repressed and suppressed memories using paper-folding and other sculptural methods of working with photographs. Clare is currently Assistant Editor at Junior Magazine which is an annual journal showcasing young Irish photographic talent, and since 2018 has worked with the PhotoIreland Foundation as a volunteer at The Library Project in Dublin. 

Efrat Arielle Peleg is an Israeli artist who moved to the US as a young adult. Efrat sees art as a universal language, a powerful tool to communicate and share the stories that all people, anywhere, carry within. While in Jerusalem, Efrat pursued working on her personal artwork is local studios. She expresses her own stories and learnings through paintings, printmaking and imaginative illustrations. 

Julie Timm Vejleaa attended architecture school at The Royal Danish Academy og Fine Arts during 2014-2017 and received her diploma in 2017. She attented the cultural institute at The Royal Danish Academy and has been on several study trips around the world to explore and study vernicular architecture and the cultural impact on the way we build and inhabit. With the institute she has also participated in a exhibition in Shanghai in collaboration with the architecture school in Hong Kong. Julie did her last semester of her bachelor at The Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna in 2017. In Vienna she studied various fields beside architecture such as print-making, abstract painting, urban installations and curatorial studies. Before architecture school, Julie attended Krabbesholm residential school in 2014 where she studied art, architecture and design. In 2016, she did an independent project with students she met at this school challenging spatial structures, objects and phenomenons. The project became an exhibition named 12 squaremeters. As Julie is interested in learning different crafts, she also spend one year after she received her bachelor degree in a bakery and was trained to become a baker and to learn the crafts and skills that is needed when working with sourdough. Before continuing her studies with a master degree, Julie has an atelier in which she is rounding out her education with independent projects focusing on small-scale and more free-form artistic experiments.

Events, Exhibition, Performance, Community

Third-Thursday 01 | Monthly public participatory sharing

We are so happy to have held our first 'Third-Thursday' of 2019, our new monthly night of sharing works. With pieces and performances from artists, guests, local community members and Fellows, the evening revolved around the theme of 'ordinary days', attempting to rediscover and explore the things happening around us that are often given little intention or attention. Involving everyone, artists, guests, local community and fellows, Third-Thursday is a time and place for participation, inspiration, and creative exchange. 

Tyler Mills is a Providence, RI based architectural designer. His work explores the intersection of history, queerness and the built environment. An ongoing project "Queer the Church" is an proposal for continuing construction on St. Peter's Basilica which would open new space and new interpretations of the Catholic faith through a queer lens. Although his work can be viewed as simply "paper architecture," look closer and you will find in the detailing that it can be constructed. Currently he is working towards being a licensed architect.  

Efrat Arielle Peleg is an Israeli artist who moved to the US as a young adult. Efrat sees art as a universal language, a powerful tool to communicate and share the stories that all people, anywhere, carry within. While in Jerusalem, Efrat pursued working on her personal artwork is local studios. She expresses her own stories and learnings through paintings, printmaking and imaginative illustrations. 

As a young artist supporting and engaging in intersectional arts and movements, Jenny Zander has been able to work alongside some passionate arts activists doing a wide array of creative resistance work in the Twin Cities. Art has added energy to advocacy, resonating with people at deeper emotional levels, while conveying what cannot be said with mere facts. Jenny has found her voice and comfort in the arts. Through body art and multimedia sculpture, she try to capture life's beauty in the many faces, shades, and shapes it comes in, while highlighting environmental issues that impact frontline communities.

Stephen Chan was born in Methuen, Massachusetts and raised in the neighboring town of Andover until college. After graduating from Carnegie Mellon University, he spent the next four years professionally choreographing and teaching dance in Boston and New York for studios and theaters, until fully dedicating his artistic efforts towards playwriting in 2015.

Kari Watson has a passion for narrative, and works to create music that is energetic, tactile and emotionally driven. Her work has been premiered in the United States, Europe and Japan by ensembles such as the Rosetta Contemporary ensemble, Ensemble MISE-EN, and Soli Chamber Ensemble. She is currently serving as composer-in-residence with the Northern Ohio Youth Orchestra for their 2018-2019 concert season with an upcoming premier of her piece “Night Music for Fish”. Additional current projects include a commission for the Eschaton Contemporary Ensemble at Vanderbilt University and a collection of pieces for Oberlin’s Experimental Vocal Chamber Ensemble. Kari is a third year composition student at the Oberlin Conservatory of Music where she studies under a dean’s .

Natsumi Osborn (b.1999) is a Japanese-American composer from Tokyo, Japan. Finding her interest in composition at a young age, she has since written for film and ballet as well as concert music. She was named Winner of the 2017 American Composer’s Forum NextNotes Awards, of the WCSMS 2017 Promising Young Composer’s Competition and of the 2017 Carson Thomas Miller Texas Emerging Composers Competition. Her work has also been recognized by the ASCAP Morton Gould Awards, and have been selected for multiple Society of Composers, Inc National Conferences. Natsumi currently studies composition at Oberlin Conservatory while simultaneously also pursuing a B. A. at Oberlin College.

Composer Soomin Kim is currently in her fourth year at the Oberlin Conservatory of Music studying under the tutelage of Stephen Hartke. Kim was the composer-in-residence with the Northern Ohio Youth Orchestra during their 2017-18 concert season, for whom she wrote a piece titled “The Blue Marble.” Her work has also been featured at the 2017 Alba Music Festival, 2018 Norfolk New Music Workshop, 2018 soundSCAPE Festival and the 2018 Young & Emerging Composers Project of the Cleveland Chamber Symphony. Upcoming projects involve premiere of “Four Love Songs,” which was commissioned by Tim Weiss, director of Oberlin Contemporary Music Ensemble.

Hyunbae Chang was born in West Lafayette, Indiana, but moved to South Korea at the age of 4. He spent the youth in Seoul and moved back to the US in his sophomore year at high school in Marietta, Georgia. One year after entering Rhode Island School of Design, he served 21 months at the Army of South Korea as a field artillery unit. After he received the B.Arch at RISD, he participated in two summer workshops at Arts Letters and Numbers and decided to stay at the organization to support any construction related issues. Prior to joining ALN, Hyunbae has been drawing a story of a refugee at the border between South and North Korea. Regarding architecture as a social apparatus, he is examining and imagining a story of the doubt and empathy in a culture by drafting the architectural plans and sections, and sometimes projections. 

Jennifer Park is an artist engaging architecture and humanity, currently a fellow of Arts Letters & Numbers. With a dual background, US and Republic of Korea, JP has pursued the ways to support people’s lives through drawing, writing, and making. Beyond the boundary of conventional architecture, JP's works open up from trivial observations in everyday life, branching out in a various medium; drawing, painting, poetry, precise, photography, installation, and architecture. 

Performance, Community

Hinges Mirrors & Eclipses | Festival

This year brought with it our 3rd annual Festival, where we once again celebrated and shared the works created over the course of our 2018 Summer Workshop, Hinges, Mirrors & Eclipses. With 45 participants, representing an incredible range of fields and nationalities, it was the largest workshop in the history of Arts Letters & Numbers, resulting in a truly memorable festival. 

The site of Hinges Mirrors & Eclipses was the wooded hillside between the Mill and the House, and on August 3rd-4th our guests were invited to explore this previously uninhabited terrain on our grounds. On an angle with trees, wood stumps, and undergrowth, visitors were free to wander and experience performances, installations, mini-workshops, concerts, works, meals and actions, which included:

Creative music intensive Concert  - Culinary Creations - Espresso yourself - Vulnerability - On going space Travel - Water Mirror - Elements - Poems Without Words - Babyhead - Open Mic - Tales From Fujian - American Carnage - Cosmos - Mirrors & Eclipses - Tone Room - Polyaman, Sine wave rhythm - FRSTRTN - Untitled Film+Audio - Burn - Taking Notes from Nature - Guitar Music - Electric Pom Pom - Communal Poem Improv - Spiral Movements + words - Music Bottles - Next Dimension - Horizon - Delay - Walking Across the Axis - Cello Concerto - Voices of the Mill group Performances 

We want to thank everyone who came and supported these magical days.  Each summer it is truly our pleasure to have the wider community share in what we do: the collaborations, thoughts and works created by all the visiting artists and participants, all of which continues to bring new energy and ideas to Arts Letters & Numbers.

Aaron More. Adrianos Efthymiadis. Alex Hae Min Chang. Ann Morris. Anne Lanzilotti. Anthony Staiti. Bahar Avanoğlu. Bill Morrison. Claudia Cortinez. Crystal Waters. David Gersten. Diane DeBlois. Ebenezer Eferobor. Ed Keller. Evan Burgess. Frida Foberg. Ginger Teppner. Gizem Atalık. Homa Shojaie. Hyunbae Chang. İpek Avanoğlu. Jennifer Park. Jenny 如 Hsiao. Jesse Maw. Joel Brynielsson. Jonathan Brewer. Jonathan Russ. Josephine Saabye. Karen Kiene. Kasper Hübertz. Keren Mendjul. Kristyna Milde. Krysta Dennis. Kyrin Chen. Laurie Olinder. Loren Howard. Manuel Perez. Marek Milde. Martha Cargo. Merethe Bahn Trolle. Michael Harrison. Natalie Stepaniak. Natasha Holmes. Nick Meehan. Nico Athene. Nina C. Young. Noah Silver. Panthea Lee. Payton MacDonald. Pedro Wainer. Rich Kuperberg. Robert Dalton Harris. Saam Shojaie. Sam Torres. Sandip Bhattacharjee. Sarv Gersten. Sepehr Shojaie. Siyu 思予 Chen. Sophia Vastek. Steve Fry. Susmita Chakraborty. Troels Heiredal. Ursula Bustillos Daza. Vaughn Lewis. Victoria Wolff. William Fillmore. Zubin Singh

Community, Collaborations, Performance

Blaq Boi | Albany Highschool | NCBI

Over the years we have been fortunate to experience the transformative work of AHS Theater Ensemble and NCBI, bringing students stories, experiences and observations to the stage. The production of 2018, Blaq Boi is a truly deeply moving, pure and honest student written performance about the young black male experiences in this country today. 

Growing out of initial workshops on diversity, equity and inclusion, as well as the student’s own experiences, the performance put the spotlight on racial identity; institutional racism, white privilege and internalized oppression, and celebrating the black America.

In addition to the performed play, each act was accompanied by real footage from the news, and an open heartfelt talkback followed each of the four performances. Needless to say, no one left the theater untouched. Keep your eyes open to the journey of Blaq Boi, because this, as one of the students very precisely said: “This is a movement.”

The play was written by students Camille Dobbs, Jacklyn Flynn, Thia Fowler, Sion Hardy, Jaidyn Hires, Xji-Anne Hudson, Zanief Washington and Immanuel Williams, and director Gregory Theodore Marsh.

AHS Theater Ensemble's director Gregory Theodore Marsh, co-director Ward Dales and Noelle Gentile, worked with Tawana Davis and Ira Baumgarten of the National Coalition Building Institute (NCBI), an international leadership group that promotes diversity, equity and inclusion. In addition, NCBI worked with the cast, crew and writers on how to honestly and comfortably discuss racism. On the production team was also Arts Letters & Numbers Associate Director Frida Foberg as set designer.

Directors notes from Gregory Theodore Marsh:

"Have you ever been racially profiled? Have you ever walked down the street and had someone in front of you cross the street because they felt unsafe? Have you ever had someone be so amazed with your success because they couldn’t believe that someone who looked like you could achieve so much? Have you ever had someone say, “I’m not saying this because you’re Black, but…”? If you answer yes to any of these questions, then are someone who has experienced some of the pain and frustration of being Black in America. 

What does it mean to be a Black man in America? For some it means a life dictated by circumstances that are beyond your control. For some it means “beating the odds”. For some it means having a life of little societal value. For me it means living in a world that made its mind up about me before I was even born. A world that said that my worth was predicated on my ability to “rise above”. I’ve spent much of my artistic life pandering to the needs of white people. My work centered on telling predominantly white stories, many tokenizing the Black presence. And on the rare occasion that the story was Black, or ethnic, whitewashing only further invaded spaces that should have been reserved for people of color. I am forever grateful for what I have been fortunate enough to do, but I look back on those early years of shucking and jiving and I see a man who had lost his sense of self and his ownership of his blackness. 

Our protagonist “Treasure Johnson” is a black boy who represents all Black boys. His voice, along with that of his father and his chorus of Black men known as The Pride, serve as representations of who Black men really are. Regardless of the different places and circumstances we may come from, we can all relate to Treasure. His story begins after his family is met with an unspeakable tragedy that changes the trajectory of his life. As he grows and matures, he yearns to be on TV, but he struggles to find his voice. It isn’t until Treasure discovers his father’s tapes that were recorded before he was born, that he begins to find his voice and truly begins to own what will be become his Black pride. While his mother and his best friend, Isabis, are perpetual voices of reason and pride, they are often overshadowed by the white “allies” and adversaries in his life. His school friend Scott, media darling Michelle Carrier, and even one of Treasure’s teachers serve as examples of white “allies” who have yet to recognize their own complicity in displaying and living in their white privilege. They highlight white liberalism that still does not give space for them to understand what it means to be an ally to marginalized groups. 

Blaq Boi is piece that serves not to educate, but to celebrate. We celebrate being unapologetically Black against a system that portrays us in an unsavory manner. Much of the media’s depictions of Black men paints us onto a white canvas with brush strokes that come from the hands of white people. We do not choose to be seen as thugs and criminals, but these are the expectations that are usually placed upon us. For our students, this play serves as an opportunity to highlight a voice that is rarely heard. Our Black students, writer and actors, have spent this school year working on a play that allowed them to be unabashedly proud of the richness in their Blackness. They have put all of their hearts and souls into this play and have embraced the idea that their Black is beautiful. For our white students involved, they have made a conscious choice to be allies in telling this story. Through this meeting of the minds, all of our students have gained a sense of pride whether it is a pride in being Black or pride in being an effective ally. 

I am incredibly proud of the work our students have done not just telling this story, but allowing themselves the freedom to be honest and authentic. I would like to thank Tawana Payton-Davis, Ira Baumgarten, Joyce Shabazz, and the National Coalition Building Institute for their assistance in preparing our students, and adults, for this monumental undertaking. We have all come to an understanding of the necessity to tell this story. Too often, the Black boy voice goes unheard. Blaq Boi is a play that takes this voice and allows it to shout from the mountain top. While it may be uncomfortable for some, it is a story that is poignant, proverbial, and must be told. We are resilient. We are brilliant. We are empowered."

Events, Community

Arts Letters & Numbers Tasting

On Saturday October 28th we welcomed a number of leaders from the many arts and cultural organizations in the Capital Region to Arts Letters & Numbers Tasting.  With this event, we opened our doors to the extended creative community around us: to share our experiences and spaces, and to begin and continue the conversation about how we can best foster collaboration and contribute to the vibrant arts and cultural communities growing in the region.

As with everything we do, we build on past experiences and our present moment, creating spaces and circumstances to grow and ask new questions.  With Tasting, we transformed the ground floor of our Mill into a space to share a meal, to connect with others, and to participate in a collective art piece. To acknowledge the significance of each person's presence, the plates were custom-made for each course of the meal: plates of glass, concrete, wood, leaves and ice.  In addition, each course was set on suspended tables of different heights, also specially built for the evening.  Throughout the dinner guests migrated between these floating horizons within the columns of The Mill, with each course and spatial condition creating different occasions for interaction.  Finally, this movement of bodies and objects between horizontal surfaces culminated with the rotation of the guests’ visual and tactile experience, with the plates being placed on the wall in a collective vertical composition, created together by everyone present.

After years of growth on the international level, this was a huge step for our regional involvement.  Indeed, seeing The Mill filled with so many engaged and inspiring people, people who are enriching the arts and culture of the region with such care and precision, was simply astonishing. We are beyond excited about what is to come...

Events, Collaborations, Community

SAUCE

SAUCE was a 3-day celebration of Soul, Motown, Funk, Swing, and Blues organized by our friends Joshua Fialkoff and Bryan Brundige. Arts Letters & Numbers hosted the late night dance on Saturday September 30th, where the tunes were accompanied by an edible installation made by Frida Foberg, Merethe Bahn Trolle, Josephine Saabye & Zubin Singh. In front of a white wall, with a projection of dripping sauces and suspended flat breads and peppers, 12 different sauces in squeeze bottles were hanging in elastic string, inviting the guests to compose a late night snack of different tastes and different colors. 

We thank Joshua Fialkoff and Bryan Brundige for bringing a wonderful crowd of people to Arts Letters & Numbers, who filled the space with amazing music, impressive dance moves and a great SAUCE appetite!  

Performance, Events, Community

Constitution Festival

On August 3rd we opened our doors for the second Arts Letters & Numbers festival: this year titled Constitution. The 3-day festival presented works created during our annual four-week summer workshop, bringing together participants from a wide range of disciplines including architecture, photography, dance, music, literature, film, theatre, painting and drawing.   

The festival began with a Persian Dinner by Sheila Mostofi and Homa Shojaie, followed by the latest film by Bill Morrison “Dawson City: Frozen Time” and a talk with the artist.

On Friday our guests were welcomed into the Mill with an experimental dinner by Frida Foberg, Josephine Saabye and Merethe Trolle: the starter as hanging drawings, the main course as transparent walls, and the dessert as a falling curtain. Between food and conversation, Bryan Brundige and Dylan Perrillo filled the space with Blues, Swing and dance.

Finally, on Saturday a line up of works, performances and workshops brought the audience in and out of the Mill and up and down the grass field, showing the multiplicity of conversations, approaches and ideas this summer unfolded. The audience was invited to see, taste and participate throughout the day, discovering installations, film screenings, construction, performances, drawings sessions, music, authentic movement, spoken word pieces, and a final improvisational performance in entitled 'Constitution Constellations' bringing together all of the participants.

We thank everyone who came to share these days with us, and all the visiting artists and participants for their contribution to this Summer’s Workshop, creating an expanded space for opening up and enriching the question Constitution.


 

Constitution Contributing Artists


Adela Wagner . Adrianos Efthymiadis . Alex Chang . Alva Mooses . Ann Morris . Bill Morrison . Claudia Cortínez . Clarice Jensen . David Gersten . Denise Holland . Diane DeBlois . Ed Keller . Evan Burgess . Frida Foberg .  Ginger Teppner . Haleh Atabeigi . Homa Shojaie . Hyunbae Chang . Jennifer Park . Jenny Hsiao . John Bootkoos . Jonathan Turner . Josephine Saabye . Keren Christina Mendjul . Layna Chen . Loren Howard . Luis Accorsi . Medina Dzonlic . Merethe Bahn Trolle . Michael Harrison . Mie Mortensen . Mira Treatman . Natalie Dechime . Nina Parsons . Noelle Gentile . Oda Ravlo . Parker Limon . Pedro Wainer . Rich Kuperberg . Rikke Jorgensen . Robert Dalton Harris  .  Rostam Gersten . Ruby Jayaseelan . Sam Torres . Sarv Gersten . Steve Fry . Tine Bernstorff Aagaard . Tingyu Wang . Troels Steenholdt Heiredal . Uri Wegman .  Ward Dales . Wes Rozen . Yixuan Cai . Zelé Angelides . Zubin Singh

A special thanks to

Laughing Earth Farm . 4 Corners Liquor Store . Hoffay Farm . Heller’s Wine and Spirits . Trader Joe . Field Goods . Renée Phaneuf . Bob Phaneuf . Bill Morrison . Laurie Olinder . John Butkus . Sheila Mostofi . Ann Morris . Rich Kuperberg . Steve Fry . Betty Fry . Berry Floyd . Gary Chen . Rob Harris Dalton . Diane Deblois . Ira Baumgarten . Nadine Baumgarten . Ward Dales . Bryan Brundige . John Desmond . Paul Kennedy . Rebecca Harrison . Bonny Cook . AND many, many more

Events, Community

Jam in the Salon

Friday 25th November

Going back in time at the House on the Hill, we opened the doors to a the speakeasy salon from the 1920’s. It was a classy event with no end-time. Musicians and friends who were either in town for the Thanksgiving weekend or who live in the area year-round came in and out creating a constant flow of sound. Lot's of songs and laughs with everyone decked out in their best pre-war era garb. A wonderful new thanksgiving tradition hosted by Arts Letters and Numbers

Photography © Zelé Angelides. 2016. All rights reserved.

 

Events, Community

An Evening of Appreciation

Arts Letters & Numbers would not have grown to where we are today, without the tireless, continuous support and help of our friends and volunteers. Though we sometimes might seem too busy to show it, we never forget it. And we are eternally grateful to each one of you for what you have brought to the project. 

On October 30th, 2016 we invited our local friends and our volunteers to join us for an evening of appreciation. Sharing stories and images of what we have been able to accomplish so far in this immense project. For dessert, we shared in the magical experience of the installation piece, Harmonic Sky in the Barn created by Meghan Mosholder and Michael Harrison.

Photography by Zelé Angelides

Events, Community

Work Weekends

The spaces we inhabit have been around for much longer that we have and that requires a certain precision of care and awareness; to repair and maintain and furthermore to imagine their full potential at every step of the way. Luckily we have the privilege of being in a heart-warming community, who sees the value in our project, and support us with their endless dedication. We are constantly learning from everyone around us, whether it’s to fix leaks or washing machines, build walls, and restore barns or how to deal with parasites. There is always someone who has an answer, or knows where to find one. Our work weekends are a great way for this kind of knowledge to be shared, where we bring people together and in a joined force focus on specific facility based tasks. So far, these gathering have made it possible to create spaces for our artists, expanded our accommodations, winterizing the facilities and much, much, more. There are not enough words to show our gratitude to everyone involved in building this project!

Events, Concert, Community

Patrick McKearn in Concert

Patrick McKearn, jazz pianist, composer and writer has lived in NYC for over 30 years.  

Before moving to New York, he studied piano and composition at the University of Illinois with Salvatore Martirano and Thomas Frederickson, performed in big bands and accompanied such jazz greats as Illinois Jacquet, Betty Carter, Oscar Brown Jr. and Abbey Lincoln. 

Since moving to New York he has performed with numerous artists including Teri Roiger, John Menegon, Tani Tabbal and Paul Shapiro in various clubs around Manhattan including the 92st Y, 55 Bar, Knitting Factory and Fez. Recent collaborations include a three hour improvised soundtrack for Jan Baracz’s film installation Live Video at Art in General in New York City. 

His CD, Throw Out the Lifeline, features his arrangements and compositions, and is available through CD Baby. In addition to teaching privately, Mr. McKearn also works as a Teaching Artist for Lincoln Center Education, Jazz at Lincoln Center, Center for Arts Education and Community Word Project. He also serves as chorus director for the NYC based Project Find Senior Center.   

I am constantly rediscovering my art by sharing in the process of making it with new people and communities, young and old.”  

Photography by Joey Pfeifer and Lyndsay Bloom

Events, Community

A Night on Buddy's Bench | Book Launch

A book release event was held at the Mill on May 14th for A Night on Buddy’s Bench – An End of Life Story – an adult picture book written by Ira Baumgarten, a local resident (who lives two mile from the Mill) and illustrated by his mother-in-law Ann Bonville Trombly, another local resident. It was a celebration of how we hold life’s grief and gratitude in the same moment.