Sculpture

Past Resident

Reenie Charrière

Reenie Charrière

Beginning with chance, and one mark, systems unfold into dream-like environments. I am most interested in how objects accumulate in our everyday spaces. My work is motivated by the drama of landscapes and waterways, urban and rural. I experiment by collecting, and transforming everyday materials, especially throwaways. Through drawing, and sculptural installation my notions play upon the unpredictable juxtaposition of natural and synthetic matter.

Reenie Is originally from Lexington, Massachusetts. She received her BA in Communications from Simmons College in Boston, Massachusetts, and her MFA in Studio Arts from Maine College of Art in Portland, Maine She has received two Foundation for Contemporary Arts Grants, and a Roderick Dew Travel Grant. She has been awarded Artist Residencies by Draw-International in France, Hannacc Can Bourni in Spain, Maine College of Art, the La Napoule Art Foundation in France, SF MOMA, Arts Benicia and Vermont Studio. Her work has been exhibited in venues internationally including Galeria Espai B, in Barcelona, 2017, and the Bojagi Forum in Seoul, Korea, 2016, and at the Chateau de la Napoule, Mandelieu-La Napoule, France, 2014 as well as all over the United States. Her work has been commissioned by San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery in 2011, as well as by the Marin Sanitary Service in 2014, and by the Peoria Playhouse Children’s Museum in 2018.

Past Resident

Carley Zarzeka

Carley Zarzeka is a sculpture and installation artist who builds assemblages from found objects and construction materials. She received her Bachelor’s of Arts in Studio Art from Dickinson College and her MFA from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Zarzeka has exhibited her work at The Guest Room, The Cleve Carney Gallery, Anchorlight, The Ackland Museum, and The Trout Gallery. Zarzeka currently lives and works in Doylestown, PA.

Critical to evoking a sense of “home,” Zarzeka prefers to utilize common domestic materials in her artwork such as wool, concrete, wood, and cotton, in addition to selectively integrating collected objects that are both found and personal. Layered throughout Zarzeka’s constant relation to the domestic space is the present of the grid and how this axillary structure has imprinted its features on household objects and structures.

Past Resident

Jenny Zander

As a young artist supporting and engaging in intersectional arts and movements, I’ve been able to work alongside some passionate arts activists doing a wide array of creative resistance work in the Twin Cities. Art has added energy to advocacy, resonating with people at deeper emotional levels, while conveying what cannot be said with mere facts. I have found my voice and comfort in the arts. Through body art and multimedia sculpture, I try to capture life's beauty in the many faces, shades, and shapes it comes in, while highlighting environmental issues that impact frontline communities.


When I paint, I paint on people because a person communicates so much through their body language. My body of work explores the relationships women have with their surrounding environments and the natural world. I center my work around women because there is a strong connection between the violence inflicted on those who identify as female and Mother Earth. The extraction and exploitation of Earth’s wealth also parallels the displacement and commodification of black, brown and queer bodies. My art is often ambiguous, which allows viewers to interpret in their own way. Each piece serves as a silent tribute to the fragility and resilience of nature and humanity.